Dave McIntyre WineLine



 

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Dave McIntyre is the restaurant and drinks columnist for DC magazine (Modern Luxury Publications) and Wine Editor of Foodservice Monthly, a trade publication for the restaurant industry in the mid-Atlantic region. His writings, most of which are available at dmwineline.com, have appeared in Wine Enthusiast, The Washington Post, Wine Review Online and WineToday.com, among other publications. He has appeared on radio on NPR's Kojo Nnamdi Show and on WTOP's "Man About Town" segment.

We're proud to feature Dave's WineLine feature on The Wine Lovers' Page! Dave will also send WineLine directly to your E-mail box. Subscriptions are free (send a blank e-mail to join: join-wineline@clio.lyris.net), and readers are encouraged to forward WineLine to anyone who may be interested. If you'd like to contact Dave personally, address E-mail to him at McIntyreWineLine@yahoo.com.

  • Change can be revolutionary or evolutionary, and Château Lagrange has experienced both in a generation. In WineLine No. 60, Dave reports on the resurgence of this storied property under corporate management by Suntory.
  • In WineLine No. 59, Dave reports on his visit to Vargellas, the flagship property of The Fladgate Partnership. It's one of only three of the old British Port shippers that are still family-owned, and the second largest exporter of Port to the United States.
  • Dave, a little late with his Christmas gift recommendations for procrastinating wine geeks, offers two reviews of wine books by blondes in WineLine No. 58.
  • Serious changes are happening at Bonny Doon Vineyards, where the irrepressible Randall Grahm says he's reinventing himeself yet again. In WineLine No. 57, Dave drops in on Grahm's "nightmare" in his quest to find out what's going to happen to Big House Red.
  • Dave lives along the East Coast, where he finds a distressing amount of consumer resistance to the idea that good wine can be grown in the region. In WineLine No. 56, he's back from judging wine in Virginia to tell us that it just ain't so.
  • In WineLine No. 55, Dave takes us on a fantasy tour of Rasteau, a lovable spot in the Cotes-du-Rhone villages that's worth a vicarious visit ... or a real one.
  • Wine is now produced in all 50 U.S. states. California may not be running scared, but the quality elsewhere is improving, and the times, they are a-changing. In WineLine No. 54Dave's back from judging at the inaugural Atlantic Seaboard Vinifera Wine Competition, with a report on what's up Down East.
  • There's good news from Chile these days, Dave reports in WineLine No. 53: The excellent 2003 vintage is about to hit our retail shelves. From the few examples he was able to taste on a recent visit to Chile, the 2004 vintage has broken El Niño's spell.
  • Argentina has an attitude about altitude, and Dave is back from Mendoza in the Andes, riding a natural high about Argentina and its wines in WineLine No. 52.
  • May Fred "Two Buck Chuck" Franzia use the word "Napa" in the name of a wine that contains no grapes from Napa? This tussle over terroir could reach the U.S. Supreme Court this spring. Dave looks into the implications of this legal battle in WineLine No. 51.
  • Wine writers often like to answer the question, "What wine should I drink with [food]?" by smiling and saying, "Whatever you want to drink!" This, says Dave, is what H.L. Mencken would have called buncombe. He explains, in WineLine No. 50.
  • WineLine is five years old this month. In his WineLine No. 49, Dave celebrates with a holiday-season Writer's Notebook full of a wine writer's thoughts, ruminations and tasting notes.
  • During Holiday season, we're all too busy to worry about what wines to pick for dinner parties, holiday fests, or gift giving. A few simple guidelines are all we really need, and Dave's here to provide them in WineLine No. 48.
  • Dave celebrates the alchemy of Oregon Riesling, and the memory of wine maker Jimi Brooks, who was taken from us too young, in WineLine No. 47.
  • So have you broken down and bought a bottle of wine with a screw cap on it? Dave pulls the cork on this not-so-retro wine-market trend in WineLine No. 46.
  • Julia Child, who died this month a few days shy of her 92nd birthday, was an inspiration to all of us who care about food and wine, whether we realize it or not. In WineLine No. 45, Dave offers her a fond "au revoir" and "bon appetit!"
  • Pinot Noir, Cabernet Franc and even Gewurztraminer have enjoyed their moments of fame in New York's Finger Lakes. But in a recent return to the region, Dave finds that it's still Riesling that puts the thrill in Finger Lakes wines. Here's his report, with tasting notes, in WineLine No. 44.
  • Your dealings with a retail wine consultant can grow into one of the most fulfilling, rewarding - and expensive - relationships of your life ... but how should you choose a wine consultant? Dave offers some guidelines in WineLine No. 43.
  • Friends meets Cheers at Iron Bridge: In WineLine No. 42, Dave takes us to Iron Bridge Wine Company, an amiable, wine-friendly new spot in Columbia, Md.
  • Dave is going through one of those phases when his brain and palate seem to be on autopilot. Food is fuel. Wine is medicine. Everything tastes the same. Heck, he's even trying to write verse! Seeking to rejuvenate his palate, he ruminates about wine in WineLine No. 41.
  • South America has been popping up on Dave's radar again, and far from heading away it was coming in for a landing. Before he pilots this metaphor into the ground, Dave gets to the point in WineLine No. 38.
  • In a special New Year's Day edition, Dave profiles Ann Cashion, one of Washington, D.C,'s favorite chefs, as she takes her gospel of "comfort food" on the road to the Niagara Food and Wine Classic. WineLine No. 37.
  • Dave has been thinking of the future as the year nears its end. Now, in WineLine No. 36, he comes foward with some wine-related developments that he believes we'll see in the coming year, along with some trends that he hopes we'll see, if we're lucky.
  • If there's any theme about wine with Thanksgiving dinner, Dave declares in WineLine No. 35, it should be, "Open One of Everything!" And if there's an indispensable wine for such a meal, he adds, it should have bubbles.
  • After a long weekend tasting wines in romantic Niagara Falls and the nearby Niagara wine region on the south shore of Lake Ontario, Dave sends around WineLine No. 34, reporting that Canada is about much more than ice wines.
  • Forget the search for "Best Wine Lists." Dave tells us about the quest for Washington's most "Wine-Friendly Restaurants" in WineLine No. 33.
  • Dave sings the praises of pink wine in his WineLine No. 32 New!
  • Summer is finally here, and Dave warms up, dries out and talks about visiting wineries in WineLine No. 31.
  • Dave is back from a trip to Paris, bearing a glowing review of Restaurant Hélène Darroze. You'll also find a vodka tasting note and a few good wine recommendations in his WineLine No. 30.
  • Last year Dave championed Cabernet Franc as the most promising red wine grape in the United States outside the left coast. In WineLine No. 29, he returns to this promising variety in two blind tastings.
  • Anti-French sentiment is running virulently high in Washington this week after Paris seemed willing to scuttle the NATO alliance just to stick a Gallic thumb in George Bush's eye. This cannot be good news for foodies and oenogeeks, Dave opines in WineLine No. 28.
  • Master distiller Sean Harrison of England's Black Friars Distillery gives Dave the skinny on gin as we segue briefly from wine for WineLine No. 27.
  • White wine has been getting a lot of bad press lately. Even President Bush dissed it, telling a reporter, "Most Americans don't sit in Martha's Vineyard, swilling white wine." Why pick on white wine? Dave discourses on these and other matters in WineLine No. 26.
  • Here's WineLine No. 25, in which Dave celebrates five notable U.S. wineries that recently celebrated milestone anniversaries.
  • Why wait for the holidays to pop a bottle of bubbly? In WineLine No. 24, Dave proposes several sparkling wines that can spruce up your meals, at home or away, at holiday time or any time.
  • Thankfully for wine lovers and wine makers restaurants in the Washington, D.C., region are taking extra steps to promote wine sales. Dave takes note of capital-area restaurants that feature wine in WineLine No. 23. New!
  • Ambivalent about wining and dining out? In WineLine No. 22, Dave explores some of the most common restaurant wine mishaps, with some advice for restaurants on how to handle the oenogeek.
  • Summertime, and the living is sweaty. When there's thirst going round-for-round with your hunger, what to drink in this ungodly hot weather? Dave suggests some summer sippers in WineLine No. 21Conventional wisdom tells us Asian cuisines pair poorly with Western wines. The conventional wisdom is nonsense. Any cuisine or dish that offers properly balanced flavors can find its match in a properly balanced wine. Dave tells more in WineLine No. 20
  • Screw caps, once the hallmark of Skid Row and the cheap jug wines we chugged in college when we wanted to "step up" from even cheaper beer, are poised to appear on U.S. retail shelves in big numbers. Dave explains, in WineLine No. 19
  • Europe's older wine regions are known by the grapes they grow. We associate Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot with Bordeaux, for example, while Pinot Noir and Chardonnay represent Burgundy. In WineLine No. 18, Dave proposes another area-grape association: "Everywhere else for Cabernet Franc."
  • Judging by the crowds that swarmed around the The Washington International Wine Festival's three rooms this month, there is indeed a tremendous market for wine in our nation's capital. Dave files a report from the Festival in WineLine No. 17.
  • This month we take on the hot subject of cloning. Vine clones, that is. WineLine No. 16 explains how clones may revolutionize the wine in your glass.
  • Dave McIntyre's candidate for this year's emerging bargain region is Spain, not exactly a "new" wine country but one that is set to raise eyebrows. His WineLine No. 15 spills the beans, with tasting notes.
  • The events of Sept. 11 should not obscure this basic truth, Dave says in his WineLine No. 14: We have much to celebrate as Americans.
  • Chrysalis winery, near Middleburg, Va., is raising the bar for wine quality in the Old Dominion, our correspondent reports in WineLine No. 13.
  • Our correspondent fights the summer doldrums with wines worth looking for. WineLine No. 12.
  • New Wave in Napa: Sauvignon (Blanc) is king! WineLine No. 11.
  • A Contrast in Chardonnay: Dave gets a textbook lesson in how this grape can perform with or without heavy oak treatment. WineLine No. 10.
  • In which ... our columnist laments the foul odor coming out of Washington on wine legislation. WineLine No. 9.
  • "You know you're a wine 'geek' when ... " - Enjoy Dave's examples; then submit more of your own, in WineLine No. 8.
  • "Shrinking the envelope." A new daughter and shifting priorities prompt Dave to rediscover quality wines in the under-$10 department in WineLine No. 7.
  • "What's fear got to do with it?" Without the intimidation factor, without the complexity and amazing variety of wine, no one would need wine writers to point the way. Dave talks demystification in WineLine No. 6.
  • Gina Gallo makes the star turn at Washington's first-ever International Wine Festival ... and Dave finds domestic Chenin Blancs worth pouring. It's all in WineLine No. 5!
  • Whereas the enjoyment of wine is one of the finer aspects of life, to be enjoyed and shared in its boundless variety for its gifts in digestion, communication ("burp!") and friendship, Dave offers us his somewhat belated wine lover's New Year's Resolutions
  • Tear gas and Chablis in Seattle
  • le Beaujolais nouveau est arrivé and more.
  • Inaugural Issue: Where's the Oak? Jancis is Coming! and more.