I love this time of year

Everything about food, from matching food and wine to recipes, techniques and trends.

Moderators: Jenise, David M. Bueker, Robin Garr

I love this time of year

Postby Howie Hart » Mon Sep 30, 2013 7:10 am

I can buy fresh apple cider from a small cider mill, located at the top of the Niagara Escarpment - wonderful stuff. I'm still waiting to get fresh Cortland apples from them - probably later this week. In the meantime, I'm eating Macs. The grape grower/winery owner I buy my grapes from also grows acorn squash and he gave me a few the other day, when I was there picking up my allotment of Pinot Gris. I stab them with a knife, cook in the microwave for about 10 minutes, then, cut in half, scoop out the seeds, cut into wedges, dot with butter and put them under the broiler for a few minutes to brown them. Major yum!
Chico - Hey! This Bottle is empty!
Groucho - That's because it's dry Champagne.
User avatar
Howie Hart
The Hart of Buffalo
 
Posts: 5930
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 5:13 pm
Location: Niagara Falls, NY

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Redwinger » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:01 am

My favorite time of year as well.
We just returned from our annual trip to the farmstead where NJ grew up. On the trip home, the car was loaded with apples from their small orchard---sheepnose, gravenstein. liberty, winesap, wolf river, grimes golden and a couple of others that I can't recall. You'll not find most of these varieties in your local market.
The family no longer does livestock, so the old pasture land down by the river/stream has been in a land conservation program for the last 20 yearr or so. That acreage is now quite "wild" and loaded with wildlife. This year, for the first time ever we observed a bald eagle soaring ovehead. That was quite cool.
Smile, it gives your face something to do!
Redwinger
Wine guru
 
Posts: 3925
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 3:36 pm
Location: Way Down South In Indiana, USA

Re: I love this time of year

Postby David M. Bueker » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:12 am

Cortlands started a couple of weeks ago here - my favorite apple.
There behind the glass lies a real blade of grass. Be careful as you pass. Move along. Move along.
User avatar
David M. Bueker
Riesling Guru
 
Posts: 22146
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 12:52 pm
Location: Connecticut

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Carrie L. » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:45 am

My favorite too Howie. This is our first summer/autumn in Maine and already the leaves have started changing. It's wonderful for me who has never lived anywhere with a true change of seasons. Yesterday we returned from a weekend in Manhattan and both had sort of an Autumn dinner craving. I made thick cut, bone-in, maple-glazed pork chops stuffed with a homemade bread stuffing, with homemade McIntosh apple sauce from a local orchard, Jean-Georges inspired roasted green beans with lemon, almond oil and toasted, sliced almonds, and roasted rings of delicata squash. It really hit the spot. This morning the lake is all fogged in. Very cool looking.
Hello. My name is Carrie, and I...I....still like oaked Chardonnay. (I feel so much better now.)
User avatar
Carrie L.
Golfball Gourmet
 
Posts: 2525
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2006 9:12 am
Location: Extreme Southwest & Extreme Northeast

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Carl Eppig » Mon Sep 30, 2013 11:17 am

We love Cortlands for cooking, but prefer Galas for eating. Fortunately our favorite local farm has both!
Carl Eppig
Our Maine man
 
Posts: 4008
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2006 2:38 pm
Location: Middleton, NH, USA

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Rahsaan » Mon Sep 30, 2013 11:26 am

You people are crazy!

I always get stressed out this time of year awaiting the transition from all the gloriously ripe and succulent summer fruits to the dull bland autumn fruits. At least until citrus season kicks in!
Rahsaan
Wild and Crazy Guy
 
Posts: 6963
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 9:20 pm
Location: Chapel Hill, NC

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Carrie L. » Mon Sep 30, 2013 11:34 am

Carl Eppig wrote:We love Cortlands for cooking, but prefer Galas for eating. Fortunately our favorite local farm has both!


I'm a Fugi girl for eating. They are always crisp, never mealy, with just the right amount of sweetness. Definitely McIntosh for cooking, as I like the moisture content and how it allows the apple to break down. I think some people do prefer to have the apple pieces retain their shape when cooked. (Not me though.)
Hello. My name is Carrie, and I...I....still like oaked Chardonnay. (I feel so much better now.)
User avatar
Carrie L.
Golfball Gourmet
 
Posts: 2525
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2006 9:12 am
Location: Extreme Southwest & Extreme Northeast

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Rahsaan » Mon Sep 30, 2013 11:49 am

Carrie L. wrote:I'm a Fugi girl for eating. They are always crisp, never mealy, with just the right amount of sweetness.


Those are my apple criteria as well, as I detest even the slightest hint of mealyness. Although from our sources in Nyc we usually had the best luck with the Pink Lady and Honey Crisp apples.

Definitely McIntosh for cooking, as I like the moisture content and how it allows the apple to break down. I think some people do prefer to have the apple pieces retain their shape when cooked. (Not me though.)


I also agree on that, although McIntosh can be a bit bland for me. I used to make applesauce weekly with maybe 10-15% McIntosh and 85-90% of another smaller harder (although it still broke down with cooking) apple with more taste and more color from the skin, although I'm blanking on the name right now!
Rahsaan
Wild and Crazy Guy
 
Posts: 6963
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 9:20 pm
Location: Chapel Hill, NC

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Redwinger » Mon Sep 30, 2013 11:57 am

Carrie L. wrote:[ I think some people do prefer to have the apple pieces retain their shape when cooked. (Not me though.)


That would be me. I'm not fond of apple pie that can best be characterized as "Apple Sauce Pie".

For the record, Mutsu is my favorite eating apple and apples are not Robin's favorite fruit. :wink:
Smile, it gives your face something to do!
Redwinger
Wine guru
 
Posts: 3925
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 3:36 pm
Location: Way Down South In Indiana, USA

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Carrie L. » Mon Sep 30, 2013 12:28 pm

Redwinger wrote:
Carrie L. wrote:[ I think some people do prefer to have the apple pieces retain their shape when cooked. (Not me though.)


That would be me. I'm not fond of apple pie that can best be characterized as "Apple Sauce Pie".

For the record, Mutsu is my favorite eating apple and apples are not Robin's favorite fruit. :wink:


"Apple Sauce Pie" rocks. :lol:
Hello. My name is Carrie, and I...I....still like oaked Chardonnay. (I feel so much better now.)
User avatar
Carrie L.
Golfball Gourmet
 
Posts: 2525
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2006 9:12 am
Location: Extreme Southwest & Extreme Northeast

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Karen/NoCA » Mon Sep 30, 2013 12:38 pm

Rahsaan wrote:You people are crazy!

I always get stressed out this time of year awaiting the transition from all the gloriously ripe and succulent summer fruits to the dull bland autumn fruits. At least until citrus season kicks in!

I always get my fill of all the summer fruits. Actually, we still have strawberries going strong here, but I love to see the beautiful pears, apples, persimmons, Asian Pears, pomegranate, and soon Satsuma Mandarins, grapefruit, and lemons. What is bland about that? I am certain I am missing a few to this list. Oh and I think Avocados come in about this time at our market, around Christmas.
Karen/NoCA
Hunter/Gatherer
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 9:55 pm

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Rahsaan » Mon Sep 30, 2013 1:01 pm

Karen/NoCA wrote:I love to see the beautiful pears, apples, persimmons, Asian Pears, pomegranate, and soon Satsuma Mandarins, grapefruit, and lemons. What is bland about that?


I was mainly joking because of course tastes are individualistic, but it's mainly the pears and apples that I find 'bland' and not as flavorful as full-on summer fruits like melons, peaches, and berries.

Citrus is glorious for me, and I always love once that kicks in. But that is not until end of November or December when it really starts rolling. So Oct-Nov can be tough months for me, fruit-wise. As are March-May, although then I bow to imported fruit like pineapples and mangoes.

Persimmons are of course amazing and full of flavor, but you get much better examples in Northern California than we do on the east coast. I never saw any in Nyc that were worth eating, although I did see some at my local farmers' market this week in Chapel Hill, so I'll be curious to taste them.
Rahsaan
Wild and Crazy Guy
 
Posts: 6963
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 9:20 pm
Location: Chapel Hill, NC

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Hoke » Mon Sep 30, 2013 1:10 pm

Braeburns. When I'm having cheese, preferred apple is Gala. Both contain crunch and flavor, without mealyness.
User avatar
Hoke
Achieving Wine Immortality
 
Posts: 10482
Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:07 am
Location: Portland, OR

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Thomas » Mon Sep 30, 2013 5:01 pm

I love this time of year, too, but it gets tiring. We just finished processing the last of the tomatoes; the okra is over with; the onions and garlic are strung; the succulent summer squash is long gone; the melons are eaten, as are plums and peaches; pears are being processed, and the apples (Cortland) right off the tree are crisp and semi-sweet. Autumn raspberries are producing about a pint a day. Pumpkins look as if they are ready to march on us. I'm harvesting oregano and thyme to dry, sage to freeze, and dug up the last of the potatoes last week. Second crop of figs are about to come on, too--unusual to get that second crop to ripen, but we are still in the 70s in the Finger Lakes, and that's unusual too. The English walnuts, however, have all been stolen by squirrels and chipmunks--first time they haven't left us any.

Normally, I plant next year's garlic ten days into October, but it looks like I'll have to give it a few more days for the weather to cool down, and that means a few days with less to do!`

In all, it's been a fabulous year for fruit. The Finger Lakes grape vintage looks quite good thus far.
Thomas
Senior Flamethrower
 
Posts: 3574
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 5:23 pm

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Mark Lipton » Mon Sep 30, 2013 5:06 pm

Rahsaan wrote:I was mainly joking because of course tastes are individualistic, but it's mainly the pears and apples that I find 'bland' and not as flavorful as full-on summer fruits like melons, peaches, and berries.


Oh, man, Rahsaan: if you're finding pears bland, you're just not getting good pears. A well ripened Comice (or even a D'Anjou in a pinch) is a thing of joy, not unlike a fully ripe peach. Eating one is a whole body experience as the juice will inevitably end up dribbling down your chin and all over your hands.

Mark Lipton
User avatar
Mark Lipton
Oenochemist
 
Posts: 4335
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:18 pm
Location: Indiana

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Karen/NoCA » Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:27 pm

If you have a good pear, it is heaven. I found a different variety at the Farmer's Market, beautiful burgundy in color but hard. The grower said to just let them ripen a few days on the counter, so I did...still hard. OK, I know some varieties of peaches are harder too, so maybe this pear is that way. I washed fresh spinach, cut up the pear, added dried cranberries, pomegranate seeds, a few toasted pecans, dressing and ate. Pear was very crunchy, little taste. I was not happy as I was told that pear was the grower's favorite. I plan to tell her this coming Saturday as she asked me to report back.
Karen/NoCA
Hunter/Gatherer
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 9:55 pm

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Karen/NoCA » Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:38 pm

The part we love about Fall is not here yet. It is still in the 70's and the summer burn on many plants is still there and ugly. When the plants go dormant, ornamental grasses turn brown, trees turn color (and we have lots of trees that do ) the leaves fall and start blowing across the street and all over, and the days are crisp, I am in heaven after the long, hot summer. Then we start to see Mount Shasta, and Mount Lassen, plus the mountains to the west all dressed in white, it is breath taking.
I love planting my winter garden, an array of lettuces that grow and do well all winter long, spinach, garlic, swiss chard, is about all I plant anymore this time of year. For Gene is is massive clean-up of leaves, dormant and dead remains of ferns, peonies, ornamental grasses, and other plants to clean-up. Each season has it's beauty and I love all but summer because or the heat.
Karen/NoCA
Hunter/Gatherer
 
Posts: 5264
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 9:55 pm

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Hoke » Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:47 pm

In Portland, Fall means the rainy season is on the doorstep. So, true to form, the last few days have been a mess of heavy rain and high winds and cold air. Lost part of a tree yesterday (no harm done though). And have parts of many plants scattered all over the lawns. We'll be wet for a few months now.
User avatar
Hoke
Achieving Wine Immortality
 
Posts: 10482
Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:07 am
Location: Portland, OR

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Lou Kessler » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:07 pm

Rahsaan wrote:
Karen/NoCA wrote:I love to see the beautiful pears, apples, persimmons, Asian Pears, pomegranate, and soon Satsuma Mandarins, grapefruit, and lemons. What is bland about that?


I was mainly joking because of course tastes are individualistic, but it's mainly the pears and apples that I find 'bland' and not as flavorful as full-on summer fruits like melons, peaches, and berries.

Citrus is glorious for me, and I always love once that kicks in. But that is not until end of November or December when it really starts rolling. So Oct-Nov can be tough months for me, fruit-wise. As are March-May, although then I bow to imported fruit like pineapples and mangoes.

Persimmons are of course amazing and full of flavor, but you get much better examples in Northern California than we do on the east coast. I never saw any in Nyc that were worth eating, although I did see some at my local farmers' market this week in Chapel Hill, so I'll be curious to taste them.

We are in agreement on this, peaches, stone fruits of all kinds, melons, berries, kick ass when compared to pears and apples. Of course so as not to appear like congress,
IMHO naturally. :wink:
Lou Kessler
Doesn't buy green bananas
 
Posts: 2981
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2006 4:20 pm

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Lou Kessler » Mon Sep 30, 2013 9:13 pm

Hoke wrote:In Portland, Fall means the rainy season is on the doorstep. So, true to form, the last few days have been a mess of heavy rain and high winds and cold air. Lost part of a tree yesterday (no harm done though). And have parts of many plants scattered all over the lawns. We'll be wet for a few months now.

I understand you received a great deal of rain for this early in the season. Now we''l keep the lights on and some rustic reds ready to warm your soul when you meander south. :)
Lou Kessler
Doesn't buy green bananas
 
Posts: 2981
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2006 4:20 pm

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Hoke » Mon Sep 30, 2013 10:01 pm

Lou Kessler wrote:
Hoke wrote:In Portland, Fall means the rainy season is on the doorstep. So, true to form, the last few days have been a mess of heavy rain and high winds and cold air. Lost part of a tree yesterday (no harm done though). And have parts of many plants scattered all over the lawns. We'll be wet for a few months now.

I understand you received a great deal of rain for this early in the season. Now we''l keep the lights on and some rustic reds ready to warm your soul when you meander south. :)


We'll do our part to be ready, Lou. :D
User avatar
Hoke
Achieving Wine Immortality
 
Posts: 10482
Joined: Sat Apr 15, 2006 2:07 am
Location: Portland, OR

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Rahsaan » Mon Sep 30, 2013 10:23 pm

Mark Lipton wrote:
Rahsaan wrote:I was mainly joking because of course tastes are individualistic, but it's mainly the pears and apples that I find 'bland' and not as flavorful as full-on summer fruits like melons, peaches, and berries.


Oh, man, Rahsaan: if you're finding pears bland, you're just not getting good pears. A well ripened Comice (or even a D'Anjou in a pinch) is a thing of joy, not unlike a fully ripe peach. Eating one is a whole body experience as the juice will inevitably end up dribbling down your chin and all over your hands.

Mark Lipton


I have had some amazing pears but they still don't rise to the heights of good peaches and melons in my book. Plus the margin for error is much lower as I pretty much only like pears when they are perfect, which they rarely are. At least every place I've ever lived and shopped.

In general these debates are interesting because they mirror debates about the virtues of different wine regions. But while I love crisp northern wines, I prefer ripe southern foods. Such a dual identity!
Rahsaan
Wild and Crazy Guy
 
Posts: 6963
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 9:20 pm
Location: Chapel Hill, NC

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Dale Williams » Mon Sep 30, 2013 10:45 pm

Rahsaan wrote:I have had some amazing pears but they still don't rise to the heights of good peaches and melons in my book. Plus the margin for error is much lower as I pretty much only like pears when they are perfect, which they rarely are. At least every place I've ever lived and shopped.


Sure, perfect pears and peaches are neck to neck for me. But I find the perfect peach even more elusive than the perfect pear.

As to apples, I love to spread my purchases around, as long as there's good crispness. Cox's orange pippin, honeycrisps, mutsu/crispin are probably my most purchased, but I average 4 varieties a week at market. Liked a new one called snapdragon this week.

Of course, this time of year still getting tomatoes in Hudson valley, and all sorts of vegetables. And non vegetables:
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B9YVNGpMvAttdG5Kd0pPOEtNWDQ/edit?usp=sharing
we had giant puffball "pizza" tonight
User avatar
Dale Williams
Compassionate Connoisseur
 
Posts: 7896
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 5:32 pm
Location: Dobbs Ferry, NY (NYC metro)

Re: I love this time of year

Postby Thomas » Tue Oct 01, 2013 10:33 am

Rahsaan wrote:
Mark Lipton wrote:
Rahsaan wrote:I was mainly joking because of course tastes are individualistic, but it's mainly the pears and apples that I find 'bland' and not as flavorful as full-on summer fruits like melons, peaches, and berries.


Oh, man, Rahsaan: if you're finding pears bland, you're just not getting good pears. A well ripened Comice (or even a D'Anjou in a pinch) is a thing of joy, not unlike a fully ripe peach. Eating one is a whole body experience as the juice will inevitably end up dribbling down your chin and all over your hands.

Mark Lipton


I have had some amazing pears but they still don't rise to the heights of good peaches and melons in my book. Plus the margin for error is much lower as I pretty much only like pears when they are perfect, which they rarely are. At least every place I've ever lived and shopped.

In general these debates are interesting because they mirror debates about the virtues of different wine regions. But while I love crisp northern wines, I prefer ripe southern foods. Such a dual identity!


I've never thought about it, but you bring out a taste preference that I seem to have across the spectrum. I'm partial to fruits that are semi-ripe, still harboring some of their "green" acidity--a parallel to the wines I prefer.

Next time anyone says I'm inconsistent, I have an example with which to fight back.

I do agree with you on the margin of error with pears. Having grown them now for thirty years, the one thing I know about our pears is that you can't pick them when they are ripe because not long after that, they are over the hill. We have to pick them before they reach ripeness but not too much before. The measure I've come to use is how easily or difficult they are to remove from the branch. It's a feel thing. This year, the crop was so large, I will experiment with making pear cider and vinegar, because two people just can't eat them all, and my neighbors have their own.
Thomas
Senior Flamethrower
 
Posts: 3574
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 5:23 pm

Next

Return to The Forum Kitchen

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests