So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

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So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Jenise » Sat Aug 31, 2013 11:48 am

My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Robin Garr » Sat Aug 31, 2013 12:49 pm

I like the look of it, and I can geek out over the ridge concept, but when I first looked at it, I didn't think there was much hand clearance under that handle. Looking at this bigger shot, I think part of the "handle" I thought I was seeing was a shadow.

Funny, though, the more I cook, the more I realize that my ancient (1974) Chicago Cutlery 9-inch chef's knife, from back in the day before the firm went corporate and cheap, is the tool I need 90 percent of the time. With a strong second place, unexpectedly, to a funny little Kyocera 6-inch ceramic chef's that I got last year on a crazy online sale for $20. (I haven't chipped it yet, but I'm careful with my knives.)

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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Jenise » Sat Aug 31, 2013 2:58 pm

Robin, I get that. I have all kinds of knives--Bob keeps buying them for me. I've got two ten inch chef's knifes, not just one but two, because Bob decided I needed a Santoku hybrid version of one. I've lost track of which one's which, but some are Henckels and some are Wusthofs. And what do I reach for? The Damascus-bladed Calphalon knives I bought at TJ Maxx. They have a name that starts with a K that I can't think remember. Anyway, I bought them as gifts, but they were so darned beautiful I started using one myself and then I liked it so much I had to give myself the other. They're actually Japanese shun-typed knives sold under the Calphalon name, but the point is that no matter what they're called I reach for them because they're always sharp. Even this week when a friend offered to take knives to Seattle for me and get them professionally sharpened, which he was doing for himself, it was the under-used Wusthof and Henckel knives I sent. Btw, the knives I love are only five and seven inch blades. I would have pooh-poohed them as insufficient and amateurish for that--like a blade for people afraid of blades--but I've to come to prefer that part of them, too. For most things, they're actually as close to an extension of my own hand as a knife could be.
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Karen/NoCA » Sat Aug 31, 2013 7:24 pm

This knife only workds for right handed people. Reviews could be better. It is beautiful, however.
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Jenise » Sun Sep 01, 2013 6:44 am

Karen/NoCA wrote:This knife only workds for right handed people. Reviews could be better. It is beautiful, however.


How is that? Even if the ridge is only on one side (and I don't know that it is), would the onion care?
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Karen/NoCA » Sun Sep 01, 2013 11:59 am

Jenise wrote:
Karen/NoCA wrote:This knife only workds for right handed people. Reviews could be better. It is beautiful, however.


How is that? Even if the ridge is only on one side (and I don't know that it is), would the onion care?

I have never used it so I don't know.....just the reviews I read on it where the lefties were complaining that it does not work for them, both on the Chefs site and Amazon.
Here is one from the Amazon site.......

First Wusthof I ever bought, last one I'll ever buy. I tried it once and sent it back. I guess I should've assumed that ridge was only on the right side and since I am left handed, it was useless. It's a great design, that little ridge to "push" food away when slicing but it's useable with the right hand only.
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Jenise » Sun Sep 01, 2013 4:27 pm

Karen/NoCA wrote:
Jenise wrote:
Karen/NoCA wrote:This knife only workds for right handed people. Reviews could be better. It is beautiful, however.


How is that? Even if the ridge is only on one side (and I don't know that it is), would the onion care?

I have never used it so I don't know.....just the reviews I read on it where the lefties were complaining that it does not work for them, both on the Chefs site and Amazon.
Here is one from the Amazon site.......

First Wusthof I ever bought, last one I'll ever buy. I tried it once and sent it back. I guess I should've assumed that ridge was only on the right side and since I am left handed, it was useless. It's a great design, that little ridge to "push" food away when slicing but it's useable with the right hand only.


Thanks for providing that, Karen, I see the problem now. The pusher edge needs to be on the side of the free area on what you're slicing. A leftie would be holding the object with his right hand and slicing with his left, so the ridge is against the stationery piece you're holding onto. Wouldn't work.
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Robin Garr » Sun Sep 01, 2013 6:28 pm

Jenise wrote:... they're actually as close to an extension of my own hand as a knife could be.

Exactly! Beautifully put, and to me exactly what I want in a knife. And, once I've got it, I hang on to i. I can't believe that 9-inch Chicago Cutlery is 39 years old! <gulp>

Of course, this has not deterred me from buying and keeping and sometimes using a whole bunch of other knives. :lol: But it's funny, it seems that in recent years I've gone back to using just one or two for 98 percent of my work. Getting old and stupid, maybe ... or set in my ways? :oops:
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Fred Sipe » Sun Sep 01, 2013 11:02 pm

Anymore, I find myself using only 4.

My chef's knife, a small inexpensive paring/utility, an ancient long slim slicer with a dried out wooden handle, and a cheap serrated skinny bread knife for tomatoes and such.

The santoku and the Kyocera chef's knife go unused because of special sharpening needs. And my laziness.
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Bill Spohn » Wed Sep 04, 2013 1:48 pm

Looks too light and to gimicky, plus I have a left handed (aka sinister) wife, so buying knives she can't use is a non-starter.

My knives are my favourite implement - the ones I get most attached to. I go back and forth between a Henkels (two little guys, not one) chef's knife, which has nice weight and an old carbon steel French knife I've had for eons that takes a great edge and holds it and I ignore the less spiffy appearance.

As I expect you all do, I often think about trying something new. The two repeating thoughts I have are a Sabatier Au Carbone, or a Santoku.

Any advice? Jenise?
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Jenise » Wed Sep 04, 2013 3:47 pm

Bill, when did you get that Henckels? I didn't recall you having that but used it last weekend to slice those beef rolls when I found it sitting on the counter.

I can't sing the praises of my Katanas enough--the blades hold an edge better than any knife I've ever owned by far. I have two, one with beveling and one without. For someone with small, unsure hands like Sue, smaller is usually better--something like the beveled Katana (a small chef knife and Santoku all in one, if you will) would be a knife you'd BOTH use and love and it would be different enough from what you have to serve other purposes.
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Jenise » Wed Sep 04, 2013 3:51 pm

Bill, THIS one. My favorite knife. While searching for this example I came across a description of these as having "exceptional sharpness and unheard-of edge retention", or something like that. That's not just sales talk.

http://www.amazon.com/Calphalon-Katana-Cutlery-7-Inch-Slicer/dp/B004XAR3IA/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1378320203&sr=8-8&keywords=calphalon+katana+cutlery
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Bill Spohn » Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:06 pm

Jenise wrote:Bill, THIS one. My favorite knife. While searching for this example I came across a description of these as having "exceptional sharpness and unheard-of edge retention", or something like that. That's not just sales talk.


OK, I'll try it! (Watch your mail.... buggers wanted $20 more sent to me here!)

Rehearse with me now - "Dear wife, look what I got you - a late birthday present....."

Thanks for the feedback.
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Jenise » Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:23 pm

Okay! Your catering books came last weekend, btw.
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Bill Spohn » Wed Sep 04, 2013 4:45 pm

Jenise wrote:Okay! Your catering books came last weekend, btw.


Probably nothing too interesting there but take a look anyway.
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Jenise » Wed Sep 04, 2013 5:59 pm

Boy, are you easy today. :)
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Bill Spohn » Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:24 pm

Jenise wrote:Boy, are you easy today. :)


They are an older set of source books for restaurant kitchens with recipes for typical banquet fare. I bought the terrine volume a year ago for obvious reasons and at the price for used books couldn't resist also picking up the volumes on Croustades / Quenelles / Soufles / Beignets and Pastry, Hors D'Oeuvres, Mini-Sandwiches, Canapes, Assorted Snacks. Need to have lots of sources for garden fare, don't you know! (Having decent food to eat in the garden seems to blunt the disappointment for Jenise for failing yet again to triumph at bocce.....) :twisted:
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Re: So it's not a santoku, and it's not a cheese knife...

Postby Jenise » Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:48 pm

Bill Spohn wrote: (Having decent food to eat in the garden seems to blunt the disappointment for Jenise for failing yet again to triumph at bocce.....) :twisted:


Uh HUM; I don't recall failing at bocce last weekend. Quite the opposite!
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