Anomalies in the Kitchen

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Anomalies in the Kitchen

Postby Jo Ann Henderson » Sun Oct 28, 2012 4:09 pm

This morning I was preparing to bake a cake for Sunday dessert. When I cracked open one of my jumbo eggs, there was another egg inside -- not a second yolk -- another EGG! The sack was definitely intended to be a separate egg, but still soft as it was encased in the larger shell with the other egg. I will cut it open in a few minutes to see the contents. What other oddities have you found in your kitchen adventures? :P
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Re: Anomalies in the Kitchen

Postby Jenise » Sun Oct 28, 2012 4:21 pm

How bizarre! That would really unnerve me.

In fact, even looking at your picture of it causes any anomalies I might otherwise think of to scatter from my brain!
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Re: Anomalies in the Kitchen

Postby Jo Ann Henderson » Sun Oct 28, 2012 7:46 pm

Well, I opened the sack, and there was indeed an egg inside! :shock: The yolk wasn't as yellow as most, but I'm certain that was due to underdevelopment. Had I been thinking, I would have tried to sell it on Ebay as a miracle! Sigh. :roll: I wonder if this is due to climate change? :lol:

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Re: Anomalies in the Kitchen

Postby Karen/NoCA » Sun Oct 28, 2012 11:37 pm

I wonder if you spoke to a farmer who had laying chickens, he/she would have an answer. Just a freak of nature, like twins in humans who do not form correctly. I have seen lots of double yolks in my time, but not that. Nor anything similar.
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Re: Anomalies in the Kitchen

Postby Mike Filigenzi » Mon Oct 29, 2012 9:42 am

Never hear of such a thing. It does look a little unnerving.

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Re: Anomalies in the Kitchen

Postby Robert Reynolds » Tue Oct 30, 2012 9:34 am

An egg in an egg is uncommon, but does happen from time to time, sometimes the inner egg even has the shell too. We have not yet seen that yet, but we have had eggs laid without the hard shell at all, and recently we've had several eggs that were a full 4 ounces in size. Some hen had a sore butt... We have had eggs with yolk but no white, and more often, yolkless eggs. Sometimes eggs get cracked before being laid, and sealed up again, making for a very bumpy egg.
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Re: Anomalies in the Kitchen

Postby Jon Peterson » Tue Oct 30, 2012 1:33 pm

Another egg story but no picture: Over the summer, my daughter was whisking together an egg with some sugar in a small bowl. After a few minutes, she stopped and noticed that the egg yoke was perfectly intact inside the wire whisk. It was covered in sugar and acted more like a hard boiled egg than the raw egg she started out with. We did not try to repeat what happened but I suspect it had a lot to do with the sugar.
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Re: Anomalies in the Kitchen

Postby Jo Ann Henderson » Tue Oct 30, 2012 1:51 pm

Robert Reynolds wrote:An egg in an egg is uncommon, but does happen from time to time, sometimes the inner egg even has the shell too.

Yes, Robert. The sack I spoke of was in fact a soft shell. Not as hard as the outer shell, but a shell nonetheless, which I cut open with a pair of kitchen shears. Really unusual, but an interesting experience.
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Re: Anomalies in the Kitchen

Postby Jenise » Sun Nov 04, 2012 4:12 pm

Speaking of anomalies, did you see the picture of the dual-colored lobster someone caught recently? I had to google it to make sure this report wasn't a joke.

http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/2012/10/31/black-and-orange-lobster-caught-off-mass/0Dxcd64fWW64TwjHlZuKrI/story.html
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Re: Anomalies in the Kitchen

Postby Frank Deis » Sun Nov 04, 2012 9:45 pm

Jon Peterson wrote:Another egg story but no picture: Over the summer, my daughter was whisking together an egg with some sugar in a small bowl. After a few minutes, she stopped and noticed that the egg yoke was perfectly intact inside the wire whisk. It was covered in sugar and acted more like a hard boiled egg than the raw egg she started out with. We did not try to repeat what happened but I suspect it had a lot to do with the sugar.


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