Pommes de terre

Everything about food, from matching food and wine to recipes, techniques and trends.

Moderators: Jenise, David M. Bueker, Robin Garr

Pommes de terre

Postby Larry Greenly » Fri Oct 20, 2006 8:41 pm

So, I have two bags of spuds.

Some potato dishes I generally make include: oven fries, hash browns, mashed potatoes, scalloped potatoes, baked potatoes and, rarely, fried potatoes or French (er, Freedom) fries. What are your faves? And are there any other interesting potato recipes that you'd recommend?
User avatar
Larry Greenly
Resident Chile Head
 
Posts: 4208
Joined: Sun Mar 26, 2006 12:37 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM

Re: Pommes de terre

Postby ChefCarey » Fri Oct 20, 2006 8:47 pm

Larry Greenly wrote:So, I have two bags of spuds.

Some potato dishes I generally make include: oven fries, hash browns, mashed potatoes, scalloped potatoes, baked potatoes and, rarely, fried potatoes or French (er, Freedom) fries. What are your faves? And are there any other interesting potato recipes that you'd recommend?


50 or 100 pound bags?
ChefCarey
 

Re: Pommes de terre

Postby Larry Greenly » Fri Oct 20, 2006 8:55 pm

:lol: Nothing that big: 10lbs. It was just an intro to my question.
User avatar
Larry Greenly
Resident Chile Head
 
Posts: 4208
Joined: Sun Mar 26, 2006 12:37 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM

Re: Pommes de terre

Postby Bob Henrick » Fri Oct 20, 2006 9:59 pm

Larry Greenly wrote:So, I have two bags of spuds.

Some potato dishes I generally make include: oven fries, hash browns, mashed potatoes, scalloped potatoes, baked potatoes and, rarely, fried potatoes or French (er, Freedom) fries. What are your faves? And are there any other interesting potato recipes that you'd recommend?


Roasted potatoes. I like to use young (new) red potatoes, sorta, but not completely peeled. Then I like to really paint them with a good EVOO, salt and pepper them, add a choice of herbs (sometime I like to use flat leaf parsley, and other times chives, then I have also used fresh basil from the garden. I also like to smoosh a few cloves of garlic and place them in the baking dish with enough additional olive oil to coat the bottom of the dish, and bake at 350 degrees until soft, turning occasionally. POTATOES! I love them anyway they can be fixed, and have been known to eat one raw!
Bob Henrick
User avatar
Bob Henrick
Kamado Kommander
 
Posts: 3972
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 8:35 pm
Location: Lexington, Ky.

Re: Pommes de terre

Postby Larry Greenly » Fri Oct 20, 2006 10:06 pm

One thing I've been threatening to make for years is sliced potatoes with an herb sandwiched in the middle. You take two slices of potatoes, place an herb on one slice and then place the other slice on top. They sorta weld together and the finished product is translucent with the herb (parsley, sage, or other flat-leaf herbs).
User avatar
Larry Greenly
Resident Chile Head
 
Posts: 4208
Joined: Sun Mar 26, 2006 12:37 pm
Location: Albuquerque, NM

Re: Pommes de terre

Postby Mike Filigenzi » Fri Oct 20, 2006 10:49 pm

Tortilla Espanola!!

Or Ridiculously Easy Potatoes (not what Mario Batali called them, but I can't remember his name for them). As posted in the old FLDG:

Take a bunch of small red potatoes, Yukon Golds, or fingerlings. Cut the larger ones in quarters, the smaller ones in halves. Heat a few tablespoons of good olive oil in a pan and drop the potatoes in. Shake a generous amount (a $hitload, in the Kansas vernacular) of paprika into the pan and stir the potatoes around. They should be well-covered in paprika. Let them cook for 5-10 minutes, stirring often, until they start to get a little crusty with paprika. At that point, add enough chicken stock to half-cover the potatoes. Cook the potatoes in the broth, stirring occasionally and adding more broth as necessary. When the potatoes are fork-tender, let the broth cook off. The paprika will form a pasty covering for the potatoes. Serve hot. Eat lots of 'em.


Mike

"An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made, in a very narrow field" - Niels Bohr
User avatar
Mike Filigenzi
Known for his fashionable hair
 
Posts: 7013
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 5:43 pm
Location: Sacramento, CA

Re: Pommes de terre

Postby Bob Henrick » Fri Oct 20, 2006 11:12 pm

Mike Filigenzi (Sacto) wrote:Tortilla Espanola!!
Take a bunch of small red potatoes, Yukon Golds, or fingerlings. Cut the larger ones in quarters, the smaller ones in halves. Heat a few tablespoons of good olive oil in a pan and drop the potatoes in. Shake a generous amount (a $hitload, in the Kansas vernacular) of paprika into the pan and stir the potatoes around. They should be well-covered in paprika. Let them cook for 5-10 minutes, stirring often, until they start to get a little crusty with paprika. At that point, add enough chicken stock to half-cover the potatoes. Cook the potatoes in the broth, stirring occasionally and adding more broth as necessary. When the potatoes are fork-tender, let the broth cook off. The paprika will form a pasty covering for the potatoes. Serve hot. Eat lots of 'em.


Mike


Damn Mike! That sounds really really good!
Bob Henrick
User avatar
Bob Henrick
Kamado Kommander
 
Posts: 3972
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 8:35 pm
Location: Lexington, Ky.

Re: Pommes de terre

Postby Mike Filigenzi » Sat Oct 21, 2006 12:11 am

The Ridiculously Easy Potatoes are really good. Didn't mean to imply that they're a Tortilla Espanola, though - that's a different animal. I can see that I worded that a bit clumsily.


Mike

"An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made, in a very narrow field" - Niels Bohr
User avatar
Mike Filigenzi
Known for his fashionable hair
 
Posts: 7013
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 5:43 pm
Location: Sacramento, CA

Re: Pommes de terre

Postby David Creighton » Mon Oct 23, 2006 12:26 pm

in and around sancerre there is a local potato dish that is fun. it is basically a two crust pie with finely sliced potatoes cooked inside with maybe a bit of onion and parsley. a hole is opened in the middle and a cup of double cream or some such is added after cooking. after a few minutes, this is obsorbed and it is served in pie wedges.
david creighton
David Creighton
Wine guru
 
Posts: 1237
Joined: Wed May 24, 2006 11:07 am
Location: ann arbor, michigan

Re: Pommes de terre

Postby Cynthia Wenslow » Mon Oct 23, 2006 2:09 pm

Pierogi. Gnocchi.

Now I'm hungry and it's still an hour to lunchtime.
User avatar
Cynthia Wenslow
Pizza Princess
 
Posts: 5788
Joined: Mon Mar 27, 2006 10:32 pm
Location: The Third Coast

Re: Pommes de terre

Postby Ruth B » Mon Oct 23, 2006 4:17 pm

We have literally hundreds of pounds of spuds at our place (garden was overly successfull)

Faves include leek and potato soup
Gnochi
roasted with olive oil and rosemary, salt and pepper (ridiculously easy and tasty)
mashed with parsnip puree
fried in duck fat (decadent but delish)
gratins

I have a nifty cookbook called "The Noble Spud" which kind of says it all.

I am also processing hundreds of pounds of tomatoes, pumpkins, corn and carrots.

All suggestions are welcome!

ruth
Ruth
Just North of Nowhere
Alberta Canada
User avatar
Ruth B
Ultra geek
 
Posts: 131
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 11:32 am
Location: Alberta Canada


Return to The Forum Kitchen

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests