Haute Cuisine for the People (of New York)

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Haute Cuisine for the People (of New York)

Postby Joel D Parker » Wed Feb 16, 2011 7:10 am

This article has an interesting storyline, giving a glimpse into the the business and personalities behind a new concept restaurant coming from Chicago to New York: Next. The menu is expected to change completely every three months. Grant Ashatz, the chef, seems like an interesting guy, and he's painted in the article as a true artist (like a culinary Warhol). I suppose I'll have to save up and plan well in advance for my next trip to the Big Apple to find out how true that is. I would be interested in hearing if anyone has had Achantz's food, and what they thought.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/16/dinin ... ref=dining

Best,

Joel
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Re: Haute Cuisine for the People (of New York)

Postby Mike_F » Wed Feb 16, 2011 8:21 am

Of course we must be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.”
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Re: Haute Cuisine for the People (of New York)

Postby Joel D Parker » Thu Feb 17, 2011 2:44 am

Thanks for that: My mistake the restaurant Next is scheduled to open April 1st in CHICAGO, not New York. I was confused by the Times being a New York paper and the fact that they constantly reference New York in the article.

I wonder what would happen if an Israeli restaurant sold tickets? Probably not a good idea.
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Re: Haute Cuisine for the People (of New York)

Postby Mike_F » Thu Feb 17, 2011 3:02 am

Joel D Parker wrote:I wonder what would happen if an Israeli restaurant sold tickets? Probably not a good idea.


If they behaved like an Israeli airline, they would overbook as a policy, and then inform all those arriving 2 seconds after the appointed time that they had missed their slot, that it was their own fault, and as a munificent gesture of compensation they could have a bowl of soup standing out back near the garbage cans...
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Re: Haute Cuisine for the People (of New York)

Postby Charlie Dawg » Thu Feb 24, 2011 1:26 pm

Changing menu is not a new idea. After while people often do not want to go to the same place. We have this friend who's father was a restaurant owner for many years before retiring. He would close his restaurant completely for few days once a year or so, would change the name, the menu, the interiyer, everything. Some time even stuff. To attract new clientele. Worked really well for him. His places were always busy. Of course it did not hurt that he was a really good chef.
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