Recipe Request: chili

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Recipe Request: chili

Postby Howard » Tue Sep 05, 2006 5:28 pm

Inspired by the Hatch chili thread, I was wondering if any of you chili heads could post a technique by which you make chili with fresh or dried chilis. I'm sure I've never tasted such a thing but imagine it must be quite good. I've only made it with chili powder/cumin/etc. I don't really want to get into the beans vs no beans debate. I'd just like a recipe/techniqe with some typical seasonings.

Thanks in advance
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Re: Recipe Request: chili

Postby Trudy Schaefer » Tue Sep 05, 2006 7:06 pm

Howard,
With your reference to the Hatch variety of chiles, and your reference to the chile powder/cumin variety -- I'm not sure if you're looking for a green chili recipe (which would involve the Hatch variety) or red chili (the chile powder, cumin variety).

I have a great standby red recipe, but I too would love to hear of anyone with a good green chili recipe.

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Re: Recipe Request: chili

Postby Niki (Dayton OH) » Tue Sep 05, 2006 9:43 pm

Hi Howard

To me, the difference between chili and green chile stew is tomatoes, unless of course I'm making what I call white chili (but that's still different from green chile stew because my version of white chili has beans).

I don't have or use exact recipes, but I'll be glad to describe what I do and approximate the quantities.

Assuming you're interested in red (tomato-based) chili, here's what I do to make a big pot.

First, I roast the chiles on the grill, then put them in a paper bag for a bit, then peel them and seed them, discarding the peels and seeds. How much chile you use depends upon your tolerence for heat, and also on the types of chiles you use. This time of year, I'll use whatever fresh chiles I can find.

My experience is that Hatch chiles look like Annaheim chiles, but pack a MUCH bigger punch. I'd probably roast about 10 to 12 Hatch chiles (depending on their size) for a big pot of chili, but again, your mileage may vary. You may want to use some Annaheims for the chile flavor without the heat (I think I recall that you cook for your family which includes children who are somewhat heat adverse). I'll also use cherry peppers, poblanos, Italian grilling peppers; whatever is growing in the garden to excess. For a big pot of chili (1 to 1.25 gallons or so), I probably use about 4 to 5 cups of peeled seeded chiles. I dice the chile into about 1/2 inch squares before adding them to the pot.

Take about 1.5 lbs of chuck roast, trim, then cut into medium size chunks 1 inch or so), season, and brown in hot oil. I use olive, but peanut works well, too. Take about 1.5 lbs of pork roast, and do the same. Drain the meat on paper towels, then put into a large stockpot (~6-8 quarts).

Add tomatoes - I have lots of Romas growing, so tend to use those, but you can add three or four large cans of plum tomatoes if you prefer; buy the whole ones and hand crush before adding them and their liquid to the pot. If I use canned tomatoes, I'll usually add maybe a half can of water. I'll usually use about 8 to 10 cups of Romas (blanched and peeled, and hand crushed).

Add the chiles. Satuee a couple of large onions and four or five cloves of garlic, if you like, and add that (I don't always add onions). Add a couple of large cans of kidney beans (or not, depending on your druthers, but they're nutritous, cheap, and tasty. We use the Brooks chili beans which are already seasoned). Add a can of beer - any kind, but I like dark beer best in chili. Add salt and pepper, a couple of healthy pinches of each (I use cayenne, but we like spicy). Add a big pinch of cumin if you like, but I don't always. Bring to a simmer, and stir frequently to ensure it's not sticking to the pan. Cook, uncovered, for a couple of hours until everything melds together. It's tasty as is, but even better the next day.

For white chili, I add more chiles (probably 6 cups, maybe even more), always add onions and garlic, no tomatoes, use both garbanzo beans and cannelloni (white kidney beans), 2 big cans of each. I simmer a whole chicken with aromatics (onions, garlic, carrots, celery leaves), then remove the chicken and aromatics, add the beans, chiles, and onions and garlic to the broth (about 12 cups of liquid), cook down for a couple of hours, then add the deboned chicken back the mix.

Sorry this is so approximate, but it's how I cook, and although I'm making white chili on Sunday with the Hatch chiles that Larry sent, I didn't want to wait till then and measure to answer you.

Good luck! If it seems to need more or less of something, then add or subtract to the approximations above. You've got good instincts, so just trust yourself and go for it...and let us know how it turns out!
Cheers,

Niki
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Re: Recipe Request: chili

Postby Niki (Dayton OH) » Tue Sep 05, 2006 9:52 pm

Trudy,

I've always called it green chile stew, but that's cause my New Mexican friends call it that. Here's what I do:

Take about 3 lbs of pork (I use shoulder or roast - whatever I have on hand). Trim, cut into 1 inch cubes, season with salt, pepper, cumin, then brown in hot oil and drain on paper towels. Chop and sautee a couple of large onions, add about 4 or 5 cloves of chopped garlic and sautee until fragrant. Add everything to a big stock pot (6 quarts works well). Add about 3 quarts of chicken stock. Add about 8 cups of roasted, peeled, seeded, chopped green chiles (Hatch if you have access and like hot. Hatch chiles only come in medium, hot, and extra hot, and in NM, hot means hot! Add salt and pepper to taste. Add a bay leaf to the broth. Bring to a simmer and cook for about 2 hours, stirring frequently. Serve over rice, with sour cream and chopped cilantro on the side. Yum!
Cheers,

Niki
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Re: Recipe Request: chili

Postby Howard » Tue Sep 05, 2006 11:58 pm

Hi Niki,
Thanks for your response. I seem to remember a thread a while back that mentioned chili from fresh chiles but I could never figure out how it was done. I appreciate your lengthy post. It is exactly what I was looking for.
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Re: Recipe Request: chili

Postby Howard » Wed Sep 06, 2006 12:01 am

With your reference to the Hatch variety of chiles, and your reference to the chile powder/cumin variety -- I'm not sure if you're looking for a green chili recipe (which would involve the Hatch variety) or red chili (the chile powder, cumin variety).

I have a great standby red recipe, but I too would love to hear of anyone with a good green chili recipe.


Hi Trudy,
I didn't know enough to ask about different kinds of fresh chile chili. I'd certainly like to see your standy recipe for either if you've got the time to post.
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Re: Recipe Request: chili

Postby Larry Greenly » Wed Sep 06, 2006 1:59 am

Howard, let me know if you want a recipe for chili (in NM, defined as meat with or without beans and seasoned with chili powder, etc.--Tex-Mex style) or green chile stew (green chiles with pork or beef and sometimes potatoes and/or tomatoes) or carne adovado (pork chunks in a powdered red chile gravy). Note differences in spelling, which mean different things.
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Re: Recipe Request: chili

Postby Howard » Wed Sep 06, 2006 12:29 pm

OK Larry, here's the thing. I never knew there was something called "green chile stew". So I would very much appreciate the long version of chili/chile education when you get a chance. And if you have favorite recipes for any of them I'd like to see them. This is a whole new category of food that I just don't know anything about. Red Chili, Green Chile Stew, Carne Adovado - bring it on!! And what about "chili" vs "chile"? Which is what?

Thanks in advance.
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Re: Recipe Request: chili

Postby RichardAtkinson » Wed Sep 06, 2006 12:57 pm

Howard,

Keep in mind that most commercial "chili powders" are a mixture of about 4..maybe 5 dried spices.

You can order dried chile "ristras" online. These are, basically, Hatch green chilies that have been allowed to fully mature (on the vine) into a red color, then removed and tied & dried in a hanging bunch. These are the basis of wonderful enchilada sauces and real chili...or "chile con carne colorado" (i.e. red chile w/ meat).

There are many recipes for using this type of dried chile in sauces. make sure the ristra you have acquired is edible. A lot of ristras go to the ornamental market and have been sprayed with shellac...or other types of preservatives.


Our family has been making this recipe for years:

Red Chile Sauce

Remove stems, seeds, and yellow veins from chile pods. Twelve to 14 large chile pods yield about 1 pint of chile puree. Leave the veins if a more pungent product is desired. Wash pods in warm water, lifting pods out of the water and changing the water several times.

Place washed chile pods in a pan and cover with warm water for 1/2-1 hour to allow pods to rehydrate. Add warm water as needed. Simmer pods and water for 10 minutes. Pulp should be soft, thick, and separating from the skin. Place chile pods and some of the water in a blender and blend until a smooth puree is obtained. Run puree through a sieve or colander to remove any unwanted peeling bits.

Measure:
1 c. chile puree
1 c. water
1 minced garlic clove (optional)
1/2 t. salt
2 T. vegetable oil
1/2 t. crushed oregano leaves (optional)
In a sauce pan mix chile puree, water, garlic, salt, and fat. Simmer gently for 10 minutes, stirring frequently. Add oregano and simmer another 5-7 minutes. This yields 1 pint or enough for four servings of enchiladas of three tortillas each. Store left-over salsa or puree in the freezer for later use.

Use this sauce as a basis for enchilada sauce or chili. You can then add extra garlic, paprika, or whatever you like. But keep in mind, that chili sauces made like this are going have a pleasing bitter quality you might not be used to. I love it, personally, ...but it might be an acquired taste.

Richard
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Re: Recipe Request: chili

Postby RichardAtkinson » Wed Sep 06, 2006 1:41 pm

One thing I ought to add... occurred to me after I posted...

This sauce is only a base. Its not really ready to consume in this form. If I were making enchiladas, I'd fry the tortillas and cover them with the sauce base, add cheese & bake.

Or..if I were making chiie...I'd flour and brown chuck or sirloin..then deglaze with this sauce and then cook the chili down.

It needs further cooking...in my opinion...to achieve its best.

Richard
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but in knowledge, virtue and even faith. And yet discovering that Reality is quite able to take such a joke. - Mahlon H Smith
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Re: Recipe Request: chili

Postby Larry Greenly » Thu Sep 07, 2006 1:47 am

It's getting late and I'm pooping out, so I'll post some recipes tomorrow. Chile is the preferred spelling for the actual pepper. Chili is the ground or chunked meat with or without beans in a gravy--chili con carne. Different areas of the world spell chiles differently, such as chilies, chillies, chiles.

But there's less confusion if you use chile for the pepper itself.

Chile powder or {better} powdered chile=powdered peppers.
Chili powder=powdered chile peppers, oregano, cumin, salt.

Green chile stew is one of my favorite dishes in the world. Not only does it taste great, it's a good hangover remedy. Chiles are very high in Vitamin C, so they're good for you. And as you ramp up your tolerance to their heat, you'll get hooked on endorphins. Chiles are addictive.
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Re: Recipe Request: chili

Postby Howard » Thu Sep 07, 2006 12:19 pm

Thanks Larry,
I'll look forward to your recipes
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Re: Recipe Request: chili

Postby Sue W » Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:39 pm

I've always been a fan of chili verde, and the following recipe is an ongoing production in our house. It changes as we feel like it and we always tweak it just a bit. My latest favorite tweak is to grill the slices of pork, since it's still grilling season in Michigan.

(I hope the formatting works, since I cut/pasted from a Word Document)

Chile Verde


1 1/4 Lb. Smoked Pork Chops (or pork shoulder or, etc....)
2 Tbsp. Peanut oil
1 Large Onion, coarsely chopped
4 Large Roasted Anaheim chiles
12 oz. Tomatillos, quartered
4 Cloves Garlic
1/2 Tsp. Ground Thyme
4 Medium Jalapeno chile peppers, stemmed and halved
1/2 Tsp. Ancho/chipotle powder*
1/4 Tsp. Lime juice
2 Cup Chicken stock
1 bottle Dark beer of your choice (we like porter)
1/4 Tsp. Garlic powder
1/4 Tsp. Salt
1 Tsp. Cumin (or to taste)
1/4 Tsp. White pepper
2 Tbsp. Masa flour (as required)

Cut pork into small bite-size pieces and saute in 2 Tbsp. peanut oil on low heat until browned. Remove from pan and set aside.

Saute onions in pork juices until lightly caramelized. Return pork to pan and turn off heat.

Roast stemmed and seeded fresh green chiles on the grill until the skin is charred all over. Peel the chiles.

In food processor blend green chiles, tomatillos, garlic cloves, thyme, jalapeno peppers, ancho/chipotle powder, and lime juice until finely chopped, but not pureed. (Note: de-seed and de-vein the jalapeno peppers unless you want extremely hot chile.)

Stir chicken stock and beer into pork/onion mixture and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Add tomatillo/chile mixture to stock and pork. Simmer over medium heat (just enough to bubble, but not boil).

When chile verde mixture has simmered for approximately 1 hour, shred pork in the mixture with a potato masher. Add garlic powder, 1/4 Tsp. salt, cumin, and white pepper to taste. Add masa flour thickener slowly (only if necessary) and blend well to desired consistency. Simmer a further fifteen minutes.

Serve over cornbread or rice.

Buen Provecho, Amigos!

*Note: Ancho/Chipotle powder isn’t easy to find commercially, but easy to make. Seed equal quantities of dried ancho and chipotle peppers, run in the food processor until they are a fine dry powder. Place in an honored place on your spice shelf.
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