Tocai or Tokaji

The place for all things wine, focused on serious wine discussions.

Moderators: Jenise, David M. Bueker, Robin Garr

Tocai or Tokaji

Postby J Nolan » Wed Jul 26, 2006 4:27 pm

Went out of my boundries last night and after dinner I happen to have had a little bag of tozzetti, so instead of the usual Vin Santo, I happen to have placed my hand on a lovely sweet wine 'Tokaji Aszù' '98 from hungry. well I have to say I was mightly impressed being the first time that I've had a sweet Tokaji, It wasn't over powering like allot of vin santo with that heavy alcholic aroma.

I have drank the younger sister as well, (the dry version) 15°, really liked it. I was just wondering whether or not someone else has had the previlige?
J Nolan
Wine geek
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Sat Jul 08, 2006 3:48 pm
Location: Italy

Re: Tocai or Tokaji

Postby Mark Lipton » Thu Jul 27, 2006 12:27 am

J Nolan wrote:Went out of my boundries last night and after dinner I happen to have had a little bag of tozzetti, so instead of the usual Vin Santo, I happen to have placed my hand on a lovely sweet wine 'Tokaji Aszù' '98 from hungry. well I have to say I was mightly impressed being the first time that I've had a sweet Tokaji, It wasn't over powering like allot of vin santo with that heavy alcholic aroma.

I have drank the younger sister as well, (the dry version) 15°, really liked it. I was just wondering whether or not someone else has had the previlige?


Yes, I've been fortunate enough to have a bottle of Istvan Szepsy's Tokaji Aszù 6 putts (puttonyos are a measure of sweetness in Tokaj, typically ranging from 4-6) several years ago at dinner in France: a mind-blowing sweet wine, unlike any Sauternes, Monbazillac, or TBA that I've had. The best examples aren't easy to find, nor are they cheap, but they are one of the world's great sweet wines.

Mark Lipton

p.s. The spelling "Tocai" is used in Friuli in Italy for a dry white wine "Tocai Friulano" that is totally unrelated to Hungarian Tokaji.
User avatar
Mark Lipton
Oenochemist
 
Posts: 4341
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 2:18 pm
Location: Indiana

Re: Tocai or Tokaji

Postby J Nolan » Thu Jul 27, 2006 5:33 am

I know Tocai is Italian it was a little Joke to get people interested, from this year on Tocai will not be allowed called Tocai anymore, I think they are going to call it 'Bianco Friulano'. as they had a little battle over the origins of the name a couple of years back and Hungary won. Look out for this
J Nolan
Wine geek
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Sat Jul 08, 2006 3:48 pm
Location: Italy

Re: Tocai or Tokaji

Postby ClarkDGigHbr » Thu Jul 27, 2006 7:59 am

J Nolan wrote:Went out of my boundries last night and after dinner I happen to have had a little bag of tozzetti, so instead of the usual Vin Santo, I happen to have placed my hand on a lovely sweet wine 'Tokaji Aszù' '98 from hungry. well I have to say I was mightly impressed being the first time that I've had a sweet Tokaji, It wasn't over powering like allot of vin santo with that heavy alcholic aroma.

I have drank the younger sister as well, (the dry version) 15°, really liked it. I was just wondering whether or not someone else has had the previlige?


Ah, yes ... Tokaji. Definitely one of my favorite dessert wines despite the fact that my experience with it is relatively limited. For more affordable pleasure than the legendary Istvan Szepsy's Tokaji (which I have never tried), look for Royal Tokaji Wine Company and Chateau Megyer, both of which produce very fine Aszu 5 Puttonyos.
User avatar
ClarkDGigHbr
Ultra geek
 
Posts: 485
Joined: Sat May 06, 2006 8:16 pm
Location: Gig Harbor, WA

Re: Tocai or Tokaji

Postby Mike Conner » Thu Jul 27, 2006 9:48 am

J.,

While I've not had Aszu (or the higher levels) from Tokaj, I have sipped on numerous bottles of '92 5- and 6-putt and '93 6-putt Tokaj from Disznoko. At the time of release, these were $26-$29 bottles sourced in PA (of all places, something I forgot to include in the non-rant part of my rant on PA).

Very yummy stuff... and if I had the $$ to purchase more recent versions, I would, but it seems to have caught on and close to doubled in price (or more) for more recent vintages. Luckily I have a couple bottles still in the cellar, as I was curious to see how these wines would age for a bit of time. I gotta remember to locate them and pull one soon!

Note, I don't recall having any of the standard furmint bottlings (the dry wines). Have to rectify that some day.

Thanks,

Mike


In search of the perfect QPR wine.... does it exist?
Mike Conner
Ultra geek
 
Posts: 163
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2006 11:35 am
Location: Knoxville, TN

Re: Tocai or Tokaji

Postby James Roscoe » Thu Jul 27, 2006 10:21 am

J Nolan wrote:I know Tocai is Italian it was a little Joke to get people interested, from this year on Tocai will not be allowed called Tocai anymore, I think they are going to call it 'Bianco Friulano'. as they had a little battle over the origins of the name a couple of years back and Hungary won. Look out for this


If I remember Agostino was fairly upset and said so on the good ol' WLDG when this all went down. I don't think the rest of us could quite work up his rightious indignation not being on the ground so to speak.
James Roscoe
Chat Prince
 
Posts: 10479
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 7:43 pm
Location: D.C. Metro Area - Maryland


Return to The Wine Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 11 guests