Great Varietals...and the Rest

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Re: Great Varietals...and the Rest

Postby Victorwine » Mon Sep 01, 2008 12:15 pm

It’s the “third tier” or “third ranking” that makes the “wine world” so darn interesting.

Salute
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Re: Great Varietals...and the Rest

Postby Rahsaan » Mon Sep 01, 2008 12:30 pm

Victorwine wrote:It’s the “third tier” or “third ranking” that makes the “wine world” so darn interesting.


Why do you say that?

Do you not find Burgundy, Bordeaux, Barolo and Barbaresco to be interesting?
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Re: Great Varietals...and the Rest

Postby David Glasser » Mon Sep 01, 2008 4:29 pm

Rahsaan wrote:That said, why such a harsh tone towards melon de bourgogne? It makes some pretty serious wines. Do you not admit the glory of the Granite de Clisson, Clos de Briords, or other wines mentioned in this thread?


Not in the same class as a good CdP to my palate, but then beauty is in the eye of the beholder.
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Re: Great Varietals...and the Rest

Postby Bill Spohn » Mon Sep 01, 2008 5:33 pm

Oswaldo Costa wrote:OK, I give up, here are my candidates:

First rank
Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Nebbiolo, Sangiovese, Touriga Nacional, Tempranillo, Riesling, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc



Remembering that a second, or probably even a third class grape can be the basis for the odd oenological hole in one, and that a handful of very good wines does not a great wine make, but a consistently good performance over time should distinguish the first class from 2nd etc., I see little to differ with in your list.

As we've seen, sauv blanc falls into first or second for different people. For Touriga, given that they use several different grapes in Portugal (an understatement) I'd be interested in hearing your rationale for singling out nacional.
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Re: Great Varietals...and the Rest

Postby Oswaldo Costa » Tue Sep 02, 2008 12:30 pm

Bill Spohn wrote:For Touriga, given that they use several different grapes in Portugal (an understatement) I'd be interested in hearing your rationale for singling out nacional.


There's definitely a treasure trove of indigenous grapes in Portugal, but it is pretty much a consensus that TN is the "noblest" among them. Not only is it responsible for the stupendous Ports by Quinta do Noval, Taylor, Fonseca, etc., but it produces the finest Portuguese dry reds, like the fabled Barca Velha (Portugal's equivalent to Vega Sicilia Unico) and my favorite, the Quinta do Crasto Vinha da Ponte (also the Crasto Touriga Nacional, the Douro Chryseia, the Niepoort Redoma, que Quinta do Vale Meão, and many other world class reds).
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