Five reds

Founded by the late Daniel Rogov, focusing primarily on wines that are either kosher or Israeli.

Five reds

Postby Florida Jim » Tue Jul 15, 2008 8:22 am

1999 Belle Pente, Pinot Noir Wahle Reserve:
Dark and brooding with strong smoky accents – all bass notes on the nose; much the same in the mouth – not closed but fairly monolithic; medium length finish. Better with food.
Too dark noted for me but I can see where others would like it better, but if I were guessing, I think the fruit will fade before the structure so I won’t keep it long term.

2002 Jadot, Moulin-à-Vent Chat. Des Jacques:
No evidence that this is gamay – more Beaune/Corton in nature with a restrained, firm, mouthful of red fruit with black fruit accents and forceful minerality. Too early to this but quite impressive.

2002 Terres Dorees (Brun), Beaujolais L’Ancien:
This vintage had a reduction problem so I have let my bottles sit – not much difference when opened now. But I put it in the refrigerator and got it as cold as I could and, bingo – reduction gone! Certainly not giving the depth and nuance that wine at room temp. would but its bright, cheery and shows no flaw – lovely with lunch.

2001 Sella, Lessona:
The ultimate ‘no brainer’ in nebbiolo; aromatic, delicious, varietally typical, complex and long – and cheap. Terrific stuff.

2005 Alesia, Syrah Fairview Ranch:
Too oaky on both the nose and palate when opened – so I set it aside and came back to it two hours later – much better; still some gentle oak but now the wine is about fresh meat, blood, salt and syrah; quite concentrated, weighty, thick textured but balanced, layered and a distinct salty minerality.
On day two it is more integrated and smooth, still some oak noticeable and the minerality is more apart of the whole.
This needs time and with its considerable stuffing, I think it will integrate its wood and its other elements and become one of the more individual syrahs from the leftcoast.

Best, Jim
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Re: Five reds

Postby Daniel Rogov » Tue Jul 15, 2008 8:27 am

Jim, Hi....

I suspect that given the necessity you and I could survive quite comfortably on Jadot's Moulin-A Vent, Chateau des Jacques.

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Re: Five reds

Postby Florida Jim » Tue Jul 15, 2008 11:00 am

Daniel Rogov wrote:I suspect that given the necessity you and I could survive quite comfortably on Jadot's Moulin-A Vent, Chateau des Jacques.


Maybe you can help me here . . . elsewhere, I was asked if I noticed any evolution in style with this wine over the past 10-20 years. I haven't really had that much experience with these; only back to 1998, and, IMO, they act more like a Cote de Beaune wine than a Beaujolais - a style I have found fairly consistent since the '98 vintage.
Do you have any experience with them back farther and if so, have you noticed any evolution/difference in style over that period?
Also, do you think them as Burgundian as I?
Best, Jim
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Re: Five reds

Postby Daniel Rogov » Tue Jul 15, 2008 12:30 pm

Jim, Hi….


Jadot acquired the property at Chateau des Jacques only in 1996 so the best we can do is talk about a 12 year history of the specific wine, prior to that, if memory serves, the grapes of the property having gone to Domaine J. Thorins, the wines being made quite differently and often categorized merely as Beaujolais-Villages.

There are five clos in all under the rubric of Chateau des Jacques – Thorins, Grand Carquelin, Rochegres, La Roche and Champ de Cour – and in addition to the "regular" Chateau des Jacques release Jadot also occasionally releases single wines, that depending much on the quality of the harvest in different areas as the clos are not continugous. Under any label, however, the wines have shared certain commonalities since the 1996 release –being meatier, more full and more robust than most other Moulin-a-Vent wines and, in fact, more than any other Gamay releases. In their youth (the first two-five years after bottling) the wines do have what I would call a "Gamay plus" nose and palate – that is to say distinctly Gamay, clearly Beaujolais cru but with an added level of depth and fatness that shows that these wines will develop far longer and far better in the bottle than their Gamay brothers and sisters. As the wines come to maturity – generally somewhere between six – ten years after the vintage, their extraordinary structure and fruitiness show fine balance and indeed the wines become more "mellow". In that we are fully agreed that one can easily mistake a mature Chateau des Jacques for a fine Cote de Beaune.

As to evolution over between vintages, what I have noted are moves towards a somewhat more floral nose (rose petals and iris), somewhat fuller body (that seeming to level off nicely somewhere about 2003), and a more velvety texture on the finish. Overall, the wine has held its consistency well, showing fine balance between red fruit, crisp acidity, spices and its meaty nature.

I do, by the way, agree with Hugh Johnson that in a meal based around Beaujolais cru wines that this one should always be served last, ideally with a cheese course, as its weight and structure would overshadow other Beaujolais wines if served too early in the meal.

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Re: Five reds

Postby Florida Jim » Tue Jul 15, 2008 1:03 pm

Daniel Rogov wrote:I do, by the way, agree with Hugh Johnson that in a meal based around Beaujolais cru wines that this one should always be served last, ideally with a cheese course, as its weight and structure would overshadow other Beaujolais wines if served too early in the meal.

Thanks for the info. and comments.

BTW, a friend visited Jadot and tasted through many of their reds. He told me that they tasted this cuvee last and only after they had tasted through the domaine premier and grand cru Burgundies.
Evidently, Jadot takes Johnson's opinion a step further.
Best, Jim
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Re: Five reds

Postby Daniel Rogov » Tue Jul 15, 2008 1:08 pm

Jim, Hi.....


Truth is that this is one of Jadot's well-known p.r. stunts - always offering this wine at the end of every tasting and generally offering it blind to demonstrate its longevity and depth. Never fails to bring a smile to the face because once you've become used to this mini-tradition you're always wondering if they didn't really sneak in a 15 yr old Cote de Beaune just to catch you napping.

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