Rooibos

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Rooibos

Postby Jeff Grossman/NYC » Mon Jun 12, 2006 1:48 am

When I need tea, I drink rooibos. It has no caffeine nor tannins. See here and here.

My question is: are any of these chemicals a diuretic? My husband insists that even decaffeinated or herbal tea makes him 'go' more often; he blames the tannins for that. Does that make sense?

[ I'm a hopeless babe w/r/t tea. It is a disfavored drink in my house, hence, I've allocated very few brain cells to its understanding. ]

Thanks for any guidance.
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Re: Rooibos

Postby Bob Ross » Mon Jun 12, 2006 2:24 am

Jeff, I thought Roibos was a mild diuretic. Is that wrong?
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Re: Rooibos

Postby Jeff Grossman/NYC » Mon Jun 12, 2006 2:57 am

I was asking (the collective) you!
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Re: Rooibos

Postby Paul Winalski » Mon Jun 12, 2006 3:36 pm

It's certainly true that ordinary, unadulterated tea is a mild diuretic. I don't know what substance in the tea is responsible for that effect.

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Re: Rooibos

Postby Jenise » Mon Jun 12, 2006 4:23 pm

Jeff, coincidentally I was just cruising the net last week trying to find out more about rooibos tea as a homeophathic allergy preventer. I remembered seeing something about it being a temporary diuretic, and I just retraced my steps and found the item. It's from the website of a South African gentleman raised on rooibos who immigrated to Canada and then started importing the tea. He had all kinds of allergy difficulties after the move and was on medication, and once he started importing and drinking his beloved rooibos (just cuz he liked it and missed it), within weeks he also found he didn't need the allergy meds any more. Of course, some immunotherapy from site-familiarity could explain that too, but....

Anyway, he said this which might pertain to your husband's (I like the sound of that!) situation: Rooibos has been found to help with insomnia, disturbed sleeping patterns and headaches. It contains no caffeine and has a relaxing effect on the central nervous system. Have a cup of Rooibos before you get ready for bed to ensure a good night's sleep! BUT - don't get too enthusiastic: If your body is not used to this anti-oxidant rich tea, the initial diuretic effect caused by the detoxification of your body might lead to a few trips to the washroom which is not exactly what you need to fight insomnia, eh?
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Re: Rooibos

Postby ChefCarey » Mon Jun 12, 2006 7:02 pm

Jenise wrote:Jeff, coincidentally I was just cruising the net last week trying to find out more about rooibos tea as a homeophathic allergy preventer. I remembered seeing something about it being a temporary diuretic, and I just retraced my steps and found the item. It's from the website of a South African gentleman raised on rooibos who immigrated to Canada and then started importing the tea. He had all kinds of allergy difficulties after the move and was on medication, and once he started importing and drinking his beloved rooibos (just cuz he liked it and missed it), within weeks he also found he didn't need the allergy meds any more. Of course, some immunotherapy from site-familiarity could explain that too, but....

Anyway, he said this which might pertain to your husband's (I like the sound of that!) situation: Rooibos has been found to help with insomnia, disturbed sleeping patterns and headaches. It contains no caffeine and has a relaxing effect on the central nervous system. Have a cup of Rooibos before you get ready for bed to ensure a good night's sleep! BUT - don't get too enthusiastic: If your body is not used to this anti-oxidant rich tea, the initial diuretic effect caused by the detoxification of your body might lead to a few trips to the washroom which is not exactly what you need to fight insomnia, eh?


I just hate it when I drink things that make me want to go wash a lot.
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Re: Rooibos

Postby Jenise » Tue Jun 13, 2006 12:42 pm

Chef said:
I just hate it when I drink things that make me want to go wash a lot.


That's, of course, a guy thing. Women love to go as often as they can, especially with a friend. :)
Last edited by Jenise on Tue Jun 13, 2006 1:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rooibos

Postby Bob Ross » Tue Jun 13, 2006 12:46 pm

Thanks for the info on the Rooibos tea, Jenise. Have you tried it yourself?

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Re: Rooibos

Postby Jenise » Tue Jun 13, 2006 1:34 pm

Never have, Bob.

From what I've read, it's an acquired taste--some love it, and some require it to be flavored. Apparently, a lot of flavors are made (I hate flavored teas in general, this doesn't sound appetizing to me). I also read testimonies from people who said they hated it initially, but then bought some other brand and found it quite pleasant--apparently, all rooiboses (roy-boss is the correct pronunciation, if you didn't know--I didn't!) are not created equal.

It was rather interesting to read about it from the perspective of a South African who was raised on it. He said that it was what kids got to drink because it had no caffeine and it was cheap--only adults got to drink beverages that actually cost money. As well, South African mothers have apparently used it for years to calm colicky babies and treat food allergy symptoms--mixed in their milk, they go right to sleep.
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Re: Rooibos

Postby Bob Ross » Tue Jun 13, 2006 1:38 pm

I bought a couple of boxes in South Africa based on a strong recco by our guide. Then tried some which was very bitter and unpleasant. May have been flavored for the tourists, though.

I'll brew some up and revert.
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Re: Rooibos

Postby Ian Sutton » Tue Jun 13, 2006 4:34 pm

Bob Ross wrote:I bought a couple of boxes in South Africa based on a strong recco by our guide. Then tried some which was very bitter and unpleasant.

Sounds like Rooibos :mrgreen:

If I have it (and that is very rarely) it's the 2nd use of the teabag when the boss is having one. But I am a bit of a lightweight on herbal teas!

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Re: Rooibos

Postby Jeff Grossman/NYC » Wed Jun 14, 2006 6:57 pm

Thanks for the quote, Jenise.

The rooibos that I have is flavored with vanilla so, perhaps, I'm not having the full flavor experience. It is certainly more palatable (to me) than regular black tea.
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