Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Founded by the late Daniel Rogov, welcoming foodies to discuss the dining scenes in Israel and abroad, along with all things related to kosher food.

Dining in a Terrible City

Culinary Poll: Getting Stuck in a Terrible City
2
13%
Jersey City, New Jersey
6
38%
Brindisi, Italy
2
13%
Baghdad, Iraq
0
No votes
Basingstone, England
1
6%
Brazzaville, Congo
2
13%
Brazov, Romania
1
6%
Chernobyl, Ukraine
1
6%
Chonchon, North Korea
0
No votes
Faisalabad, Pakistan
1
6%
Grozny, Chechnia
0
No votes
Juba, Sudan
0
No votes
Linfin, China
0
No votes
 
Total votes : 16

Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby Daniel Rogov » Wed Jul 21, 2010 6:07 am

Culinary Poll: Getting Stuck in a Terrible City

Assuming that for some quirk of fate you are forced to dine every day for an entire week in the same terrible city*. Which city of those listed would be your choice? And why?


*All, of course, with apologies to any who may happen to live in one of those cities
User avatar
Daniel Rogov
Resident Curmudgeon
 
Posts: 12964
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:10 am
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby Robin Garr » Wed Jul 21, 2010 9:01 am

Gotta be Brindisi. No place in Italy has bad food. 8)
User avatar
Robin Garr
Forum Janitor
 
Posts: 17034
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 2:44 pm
Location: Louisville, KY

Re: Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby Daniel Rogov » Wed Jul 21, 2010 10:15 am

Robin Garr wrote:Gotta be Brindisi. No place in Italy has bad food. 8)



I give you my personal oath, Robin.....not even a decent pizza, calzone or pasta dish in all of Brindis!

Best
Rogov
User avatar
Daniel Rogov
Resident Curmudgeon
 
Posts: 12964
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:10 am
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby Tim York » Wed Jul 21, 2010 12:19 pm

I take a punt on Brazzaville. Surely some French influence still remains?
Tim York
Tim York
Wine guru
 
Posts: 3864
Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 3:48 pm
Location: near Lisieux, France

Re: Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby Daniel Rogov » Wed Jul 21, 2010 12:25 pm

I go for Jersey City. A city of no charm whatsoever, in which the "numbers game" is the main hope in life for most peope, in which the mob rules government and the numbers game equally, and in which even the parks are ugly. Why.....great diners in Jersey City. Great corned beef hash, fabulous Polish, Jewish and Italian delicatesens, two plants that turn out great kosher hot dogs, several bakeries that produce for New York City's very best restuarnats, and great Italian ices wherever you look. Oh yes...and plenty of bars in which to pass the time until your sentence is commuted.

Best
Rogov
User avatar
Daniel Rogov
Resident Curmudgeon
 
Posts: 12964
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:10 am
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby Tim York » Wed Jul 21, 2010 3:26 pm

Daniel Rogov wrote:I go for Jersey City. A city of no charm whatsoever, in which the "numbers game" is the main hope in life for most peope, in which the mob rules government and the numbers game equally, and in which even the parks are ugly. Why.....great diners in Jersey City. Great corned beef hash, fabulous Polish, Jewish and Italian delicatesens, two plants that turn out great kosher hot dogs, several bakeries that produce for New York City's very best restuarnats, and great Italian ices wherever you look. Oh yes...and plenty of bars in which to pass the time until your sentence is commuted.

Best
Rogov


As a fan of the Sopranos, it did occur to me that Jersey City might be the best choice; they seem to enjoy their Italian inspired food at Artie's restaurant.
Tim York
Tim York
Wine guru
 
Posts: 3864
Joined: Tue May 09, 2006 3:48 pm
Location: near Lisieux, France

Re: Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby Joel D Parker » Thu Jul 22, 2010 6:11 am

Tim,

I also voted for Brazzaville. My younger sister was there as a French-Englist translator for some Americans doing social work about 6 or 7 years ago. She said the international restaurants weren't bad, and the people who had the means to invite them over for dinner served great local food. So as a visitor, it's perhaps not the worst place to be. Plus everything is very inexpensive for those with foreign currencies.

She did mention a rather disturbing story though. In the 1997 civil war transportation lines were cut off in various parts of the country and there there was a lot of looting, violence and general fear in Brazzaville, so eventually the supply of food ran out. Desperate citizens, according to the version of the story she heard, stormed the city zoo and slaughtered all the animals in order to survive. Of course the war is over, but the zoo was still empty when she was there.

Best,

Joel
Joel D Parker
Wine guru
 
Posts: 587
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 4:32 am

Re: Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby Matilda L » Thu Jul 22, 2010 9:02 am

Well, I'm a bit of a wimp about where I travel to. If there is civil unrest, rampant disease, war, guerilla or pirate activity, or it's a natural disaster zone, I probably don't want to go there right now. The Francophile spent the first two years of his life in the Congo ... I think it was the "other Congo" though, the former Belgian Congo ... the Democratic Republic rather than the Republic ... confusing, and he's not round to ask. Anyway, maybe I'll choose Brazzaville, and take him back to approximately where he used to live way back when. There must be some interesting places to eat.
User avatar
Matilda L
Sparkling Red Riding Hood
 
Posts: 1336
Joined: Wed Jul 16, 2008 5:48 am
Location: Adelaide, South Australia

Re: Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby Victor de la Serna » Fri Jul 23, 2010 4:51 am

What's this, calling Jersey City a "terrible city"? I fully disagree.
Victor de la Serna
Ultra geek
 
Posts: 311
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2006 1:50 pm
Location: Madrid, Spain

Re: Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby David M. Bueker » Fri Jul 23, 2010 8:54 am

It has to be Jersey City. It's easy to BYO in Jersey, so even if it's a bad meal you can have good wine.
There behind the glass lies a real blade of grass. Be careful as you pass. Move along. Move along.
User avatar
David M. Bueker
Riesling Guru
 
Posts: 22007
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 12:52 pm
Location: Connecticut

Re: Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby Sam Platt » Wed Jul 28, 2010 12:16 am

Rogov,

Have you actually eaten in Juba, Sudan? Has anyone? Citizens included?
Sam

"What lies behind us and what lies before us are a small
matter compared to what lies within us" -Emerson
Sam Platt
I am Sam, Sam I am
 
Posts: 2324
Joined: Sat Mar 25, 2006 1:22 pm
Location: Indiana, USA

Re: Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby Daniel Rogov » Wed Jul 28, 2010 2:45 am

Sam Platt wrote:Have you actually eaten in Juba, Sudan? Has anyone? Citizens included?




Sam, Hi.....

Certainly not I. Heck..I don't even know if anyone eats in Juba. 8)
User avatar
Daniel Rogov
Resident Curmudgeon
 
Posts: 12964
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:10 am
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: Culintary Poll: Dining In Terrible Cities

Postby Trevor F » Wed Aug 11, 2010 6:14 am

Funny you should mention Chernobyl in the Ukraine. The following is an extract of what I wrote in the former Rogov Forum in 2008 :


" I spent three nights in the Ukraine this week for a client based in Brussels.

I flew to Kiev and then on to Chernigov, about 90 miles north on the way to Belarus. Wikipedia writes that Chernigov is famous for having the highest rate of thyroid cancer in the world.

On the first day we had lunch behind a cash dispenser. I needed a cash dispenser ( aka ATM ) so we stopped at a bank outside Chernigov on one of the sprawling factory estates. You opened the door behind the ATM and inside was a small canteen. I asked what the ryba ( fish ) was and they said it was salmon, so I had salmon with kasha.

In the evening I was taken to a bar in downtown Chernigov opposite the Ukraina Hotel at the corner of Prospekt Mir ( Peace Avenue ). I asked for a beer but they had run out of beer. I asked what fish they had to eat and they replied salmon. I noticed borscht on the menu but they had run of that as well. So I had salmon with peaches and rice. As there was no beer I ordered a glass of red Ukrainian wine, the less said about that the better.

After dinner my colleagues suggested that we went for a beer. Walking down the street they went into a small shop to buy bottles of beer. ' Is Ukrainian custom to drink beer in street ' they told me. I really didn't like the idea of walking along drinking beer out of a bottle so I found a bar that looked like a MacDonalds inside and bought three bottles of Chernigivkye beer for 13.50 gryvnia, about £ 1.50. It's the same beer as Stella Artois, brewed by the same company, Interbrew.
On day two for lunch we went back to the canteen behind the ATM. I asked what fish they had to eat and they replied salmon. So I had salmon with kasha.

In the evening I returned to Kiev by taxi from Chernigiv. It is a straight and flat road passing through several villages, the driver slowing down in the villages for any police speed traps, otherwise driving at a constant speed of 110-120 kilometers an hour. We reached Kiev at dusk and in heavy rain, the driver maintaining the same 110-120 kilometers an hour through the city, weaving between lanes in the rain, over a wide river, through underpasses, over bridges, the entire city seen in a blur of rain and spray from trucks, until we reached the Mir Hotel near Holeevskaya Park which the driver found without problem. I had intended to visit the Podol, the old quarter of Kiev where I understood there are several fashionable bars and restaurants but the heavy rain stopped that and I stayed in the Mir Hotel, a 1960s construction, the lobby of which looked like the entrance to a 1950s NHS hospital.

The hotel had a PECTOPAH or restaurant. I followed the signs from the lobby, down some stairs, along a long corridor, up some stairs, down another corridor, down more stairs until I saw the restaurant which appeared closed as it was dark inside. However this was just dark glass on the windows or they hadn't been cleaned. I pushed open the door and walked into what could have been the stage set for Vera Drake, a film set in London in 1950. Two drab and gloomy converted bedrooms put together. I asked what fish they had and the waitress replied salmon. I started with Ukrainian borsht. Instead of a deep beetroot colour, this came up the colour of blood orange with bits of egg floating on top and cheese. In the 1990s at the erstwhile Cafe Eilat in Warsaw I had fantastic borsht. This one was just horrible, tasting vaguely of beetroot and cheese. I left it.

Then the fried salmon with rice was served, the third helping of salmon and rice in as many days. I paid the bill and ran.

Early next morning I went to Borispol airport to fly back to civilisation. This place looks like an airport in 1959. Before going through passport control I was stopped by a Ukrainian woman in a uniform resembling Rosa Kleb in From Russia with Love. ' Ukrainian Customs. How much money you have ? ' I had not been asked that question for about 30 years. Haven't these people heard of credit cards, cash cards or debit cards ? Don't they know that not many people walk around with wads of the wonder wallet-filler on them anymore ? Haven't they heard of free global capital flows ?

What a pleasure it was therefore upon returning to Belgium yesterday to have a simple dinner in the conservatory at the Oratienhof in Leuven, just the other side of Brussels airport. An Italian trattoria, with their own home-made pasta. I had tagliatelle napoletana, a rich tomato sauce , with two glasses of Dolcetto. No salmon. The Oratienhof has other simple pasta dishes plus pizzas. Good stuff. The trattoria is at 111 Mechelsestraat, Leuven. "
Trevor F
Ultra geek
 
Posts: 250
Joined: Sat Jul 19, 2008 12:48 pm
Location: London


Return to Israeli and Kosher Culinary Corner

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests