The "New" Heinz Packaging

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The "New" Heinz Packaging

Postby Daniel Rogov » Sun May 23, 2010 1:54 pm

Heinz has come out with a new packaging for their individual portions of their ketchup. See a somewhat amusing link
(sent to me of course by one of my faithful correspondents) at http://slatev.com/video/ketchup-packet-smackdown

As to comments:

1. With regard to the packaging - remarkably similar to those horrible things that are served at thousands of cafes around the world when you order a croissant. I hate those packages with a flying purple passion.

2. With regard to Heinz ketchup - I can understand why most people use commercially prepared ketchup. Simply stated, most people do not care that much about what they eat. I cannot understand people who consider themselves connoisseurs use such ketchup. Commerically prepared ketchup is not so much a sauce to heighten the flavors of what it is meant to accompany. It is meant largely to hide those flavors. On the other hand homemade ketchup can be incredibly delicious.

3. With further regard to Heinz ketchup - I forgive all of the fast food and cheap mass-market eateries that use Heinz or other commercial ketchups. I do not forgive any person who calls him/herself "chef" for serving those. I have a firm rule - if they do not or cannot make ketchup for me, I do not want them making bearnaise sauce either!

And those are among the reasons I consider myself a curmudgeon!

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Re: The "New" Heinz Packaging

Postby Charlie Dawg » Mon May 24, 2010 3:22 pm

I hate heintz ketchup no matter what container it comes in. Not that, Del Monte brand, that I kike is any better, but it goes well with horible American made cold cuts.
You are what you eat.
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Re: The "New" Heinz Packaging

Postby Daniel Rogov » Mon May 24, 2010 3:43 pm

Charlie, Hi....

With regard to American cold cuts (salamis, bologna, pickled tongue, sausages meant to be served cold, etc), I agree that much is "junk" and in need of a good deal of mustard, mayonnaise, ketchup or even chimichurri sauce to make it appealing to the palate. There are, however excellent sausages available not only in America but made in America, many of those available from small, often ethnically owned, indepedent butchers. I think in particular of Russian, Swiss and German sausages. There is also no shortage in America of fine imported sausages from Italy, France and other countries.

The problem one encounters is when speaking of sausages and cold cuts that are specifically kosher, for there indeed over-commercialization has resulted in a blanding-down of many of these meats. Despite that, I have succeeded in finding fine kosher hot dogs, knockwurst (in Jewish delis often known as "specials"), tongue (pickled and smoked) and yes, even bologna (that under the guise of kosher Mortadella). Search, my man and thou shalt find.

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Re: The "New" Heinz Packaging

Postby Charlie Dawg » Thu May 27, 2010 5:56 pm

Yes, indeed, there is good amongst some bad stuff, but that is already a completely different thread. Back to ketchup ... :)
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Re: The "New" Heinz Packaging

Postby Karen/NoCA » Sun May 30, 2010 3:57 pm

The ketchup testing infomercial was meant for comedy, right? Must be, because it gave me a good laugh during my break from morning chores. The fact that any poor soul would have to put their hamburger down on the park bench and use both hands to open the new packet, while the burger is in great danger of falling off the plate was especially funny. What next? Will we expect to be fed while on the run... The next funny was eating the fries in the car, while driving and dipping the fry into the test packet. Hmmm, we need to write a law against that one, cause I guess some folks don't know that is very dangerous. :roll: Personally, I like Heinz ketchup, hate the packets and will never use them, anywhere. I do without, or use mustard, from a jar. At our house, the ketchup bottle lasts for a very long time, we like it on the occasional home made hamburgers, and Gene likes it on his fries. Our grandkids don't even use it.
Anyone have a good ketchup recipe they'd like to share?
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Re: The "New" Heinz Packaging

Postby Daniel Rogov » Sun May 30, 2010 4:47 pm

Karen, Hi.....

Following is the recipe I almost often follow.





Ketchup - The Home-Made Variety

Because making home-made ketchup is a time-consuming process, many find that it is best to prepare large amounts at a time and because most of the ketchup will have to be stored for a relativelky long period of time, be absolutely certain that the jars and bottles to be used for storage are perfectly sterilized and well sealed.

3 1/2 kilos ripe tomatoes, unpeeled and chopped
6 medium onions, chopped finely
2 sweet red peppers, halved, seeded and chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 hot red pepper
2 bay leaves
1 Tablespoon celery, chopped
1 Tablespoon mustard seeds
1 teaspoon whole peppercorns
1 stick cinnamon, about 4 cm. long
1 Tablespoon salt
2 cups vinegar
1/2 cup each brown sugar and white sugar

In a large saucepan combine the tomatoes, onions, red peppers and garlic cloves and pour over water to cover. Bring to a boil and boil until the vegetables are completely soft (40 - 50 min- utes). Strain through a sieve, pressing well with a wooden spoon.

Tie the hot pepper, bay leaves, celery, mustard seeds, peppercorns and cinnamon in a muslin sack and place these in the strained liquids. Add the salt and return to the boil. Continue boiling, stirring frequently, until the mixture is reduced to half its original quantity.

Remove from the flame, add the vinegar and brown and white sugar and stir well. Return to the flame, bring to a boil and then reduce the flame so that the ketchup is simmering gently.

Continue simmering, stirring occasionally for 15 - 20 minutes or until the sauce is thickened to the desired point. Discard the sack with the spices and, while still hot seal the ketchupin sterile jars or bottles.

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Re: The "New" Heinz Packaging

Postby Karen/NoCA » Sun May 30, 2010 8:54 pm

Thanks Daniel, this sounds excellent. I made ketchup years ago when we had a huge garden. I remember it was very good. There are some things one ceases to do after the children are gone and there are only two at home, but I certainly would like to try this again. It would make great hostess gifts for the friends we share dinners at home with.
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Re: The "New" Heinz Packaging

Postby Matilda L » Mon May 31, 2010 12:26 am

When I was a kid, too young to know better, I was quite fond of commercial tomato sauce. The usual brand on the table was Rosella. Tomato sauce was an essential for eating in fritz sandwiches, and on grilled sausages. We kids used to like sauce sandwiches, too - just a splodge of tomato sauce on buttered white bread. Hey, we were kids, we didn't know any better. These days, I never have anything like this stuff in the house - Heinz, Rosella, or whomever.
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