WTN: '96 Puligny Montrachet

The place for all things wine, focused on serious wine discussions.

Moderators: Jenise, David M. Bueker, Robin Garr

WTN: '96 Puligny Montrachet

Postby wrcstl » Mon Apr 10, 2006 11:33 am

Opened a '96 Puligny Montrachet Les Folatiores by Trebuchet on Saturday night. Deep golden color, palate of roasted almonds with honeydew in the background and a complex deep full body. The finish would not quit and it was sad to see the bottle empty. The wine was perfectly ready to drink and may not get any better but still young, vibrant and proably good for at least another 5 years. This is the best white wine from recent memory and may be in my top 10 ever. A great marriage of terroir, bottle age and the proper use of oak. If anyone was concerned about '96 Burgs this would certainly calm your concerns.
Walt
User avatar
wrcstl
Wine guru
 
Posts: 886
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 3:20 pm
Location: St. Louis

Pre-thread Message

Postby JC (NC) » Mon Apr 10, 2006 1:05 pm

Walt, I don't know how permissive Missouri is about wine shipments from retailers out-of-state. I think Carolina Wine Company in Raleigh may have an exclusive on Benoit Ente's wines in this country. His white Burgundies are marvelous and reasonably priced (for Burgundy). I especially like the Puligny-Montrachet Champ Gain (not sure of spelling--I see this as Champs Gains with 's' on each word ending and other variations) but even his bourgogne blanc is surprisingly good. The balance of fruit and oak is one of the things I like in his wines (also in Jean Marc Morey's white Burgundies).
JC (NC)
Lifelong Learner
 
Posts: 6041
Joined: Mon Mar 27, 2006 1:23 pm
Location: Fayetteville, NC

Pre-thread Message

Postby wrcstl » Mon Apr 10, 2006 1:19 pm

JC,
Missouri has its faults but wine legislation is not one of them. We BYOB everywhere and you can get wine shipped in from anywhere. I am very much a oakaphobe and have been restricting my white burgs to Chablis and village sutff that I taste before purchasing more than one bottle. After having the '96 P-M I may have to rethink my approach. A good white Burg (P-M or C-M) without oak would not be worth cellaring. The problem I have is when they use too much oak. It's a thin line but that is why we get paid so much to collect and cellar wine. I have never bought from Carolina Wine Company but will take a look.
Walt
User avatar
wrcstl
Wine guru
 
Posts: 886
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 3:20 pm
Location: St. Louis

Pre-thread Message

Postby JC (NC) » Wed Apr 12, 2006 1:41 pm

You might have to e-mail and inquire. I don't think their website
http://carolinawine.biz/index.asp?CartId={7EVEREST83846B9-07E1-4D4A-874E-59C6388AAC2D} lists anything like their total stock. For instance, if you look for wines from France it lists only two pre-arrival wines when actually they have dozens of wines (white and red Burgundies, Loire, Rhone, Bordeaux) available.
JC (NC)
Lifelong Learner
 
Posts: 6041
Joined: Mon Mar 27, 2006 1:23 pm
Location: Fayetteville, NC

Pre-thread Message

Postby Paul B. » Wed Apr 12, 2006 2:06 pm

Walt, I notice that the Berry Bros. & Rudd's vintage chart for France shows '96 as an exceptional vintage in Chablis. Do you think that the bottle age was necessary to get the level of integration in the wine that you describe?

I would buy more Chablis myself but I'm not entirely clear on whether cellar time is a must, or just an option. My experience to-date is mainly with Ontario Chardonnay, and these have been compared to Chablis but the difference is that they are always accessible upon release. Age seems to create complexity, but isn't absolutely necessary.[/url]
Hybrid Wines Online:
http://hybridwines.blogspot.ca
User avatar
Paul B.
Hybrid Guru
 
Posts: 2024
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 12:38 am
Location: Ontario, Canada

Pre-thread Message

Postby David M. Bueker » Wed Apr 12, 2006 3:01 pm

Paul B. wrote:Walt, I notice that the Berry Bros. & Rudd's vintage chart for France shows '96 as an exceptional vintage in Chablis. Do you think that the bottle age was necessary to get the level of integration in the wine that you describe?

I would buy more Chablis myself but I'm not entirely clear on whether cellar time is a must, or just an option. My experience to-date is mainly with Ontario Chardonnay, and these have been compared to Chablis but the difference is that they are always accessible upon release. Age seems to create complexity, but isn't absolutely necessary.[/url]


I'm not Walt, but I will say that I find Chablis accessible on release in most vintages, but after a year or two it shuts down only to re-emerge as a more complex wine after 7 years or so in bottle.
There behind the glass lies a real blade of grass. Be careful as you pass. Move along. Move along.
User avatar
David M. Bueker
Riesling Guru
 
Posts: 21991
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 12:52 pm
Location: Connecticut


Return to The Wine Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 11 guests