WTN: A nice Croatian Malvazija

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WTN: A nice Croatian Malvazija

Postby Otto » Sun Apr 21, 2013 12:25 pm

I went to a friend's place for dinner (pasta with some variety or other of Boletaceae). I took with me a Ridge Lytton Springs 2010 - no need for a TN for that since I so recently posted on it.

I also took a Croatian wine, Copa Malvazija 2010 from Istria. It had a very ozoney/reductive aroma at first so we decanted and left it for a couple hours. When we finally came back to it, it had transformed into a lovely wine! It smelled a bit oxidative (can a wine be both reductive and oxidative?) and appley, but had wonderful, floral perfume and waxy, white Musary character, too! Not terribly high in acidity, but moreish and not too heavy in the fruit department. Very nice! It's expensive for a Croatian wine at 20€ but worth it IMO.
I don't drink wine because of religious reasons ... only for other reasons.

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Re: WTN: A nice Croatian Malvazija

Postby TomHill » Mon Apr 22, 2013 10:17 am

Otto wrote:I went to a friend's place for dinner (pasta with some variety or other of Boletaceae). I took with me a Ridge Lytton Springs 2010 - no need for a TN for that since I so recently posted on it.

I also took a Croatian wine, Copa Malvazija 2010 from Istria. It had a very ozoney/reductive aroma at first so we decanted and left it for a couple hours. When we finally came back to it, it had transformed into a lovely wine! It smelled a bit oxidative (can a wine be both reductive and oxidative?) and appley, but had wonderful, floral perfume and waxy, white Musary character, too! Not terribly high in acidity, but moreish and not too heavy in the fruit department. Very nice! It's expensive for a Croatian wine at 20€ but worth it IMO.

Could be, Otto. From your description, it might have been made w/ some skin contact during fermentation. That's a pretty common technique up in that part
of the world. Depending upon the length of skin contact, it can reduce the varietal character and give the wine a phenolic/apple cider character
and a bit of a tannic bite on the palate.
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