Aging Wine Underwater

The place for all things wine, focused on serious wine discussions.

Moderators: Jenise, David M. Bueker, Robin Garr

Aging Wine Underwater

Postby Carl Eppig » Fri Feb 22, 2013 12:13 pm

Dan Berger reports today that Mira Winery in Napa is planning to age wine under Charleston Harbor. He has no answers as to why, why there, how long, how transported, etc.? Does anyone have any more information on this?
Carl Eppig
Our Maine man
 
Posts: 4009
Joined: Tue Jun 13, 2006 2:38 pm
Location: Middleton, NH, USA

Re: Aging Wine Underwater

Postby Dale Williams » Fri Feb 22, 2013 3:29 pm

http://gma.yahoo.com/blogs/abc-blogs/ca ... cipes.html

3 months.
Pure marketing exercise (excuse me, I meant pure dumb@#s marketing exercise)
User avatar
Dale Williams
Compassionate Connoisseur
 
Posts: 7899
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 5:32 pm
Location: Dobbs Ferry, NY (NYC metro)

Re: Aging Wine Underwater

Postby JC (NC) » Fri Feb 22, 2013 3:59 pm

A lot of homeowners could age their wines underwater just by keeping it in their "underwater" homes.
JC (NC)
Lifelong Learner
 
Posts: 6076
Joined: Mon Mar 27, 2006 1:23 pm
Location: Fayetteville, NC

Re: Aging Wine Underwater

Postby Peter May » Sat Feb 23, 2013 1:08 pm

Since its only underwater for 3 months it is hardly an experiment in ageing....

I know several wineries have done this, one which I follow is Souther Right in South Africa who put their Sauvignon Blanc 9 metres under False Bay for 2 years.

I saw pix of the bottles afterwards, they were covered in barnacles, and the wine quickly sold out ..

The Southern Right team has already conducted several tastings comparing the sea-aged and cellar-aged bottles. In all tastings the sea-aged wine was fresher, tighter, lighter in colour and less developed, while still showcasing a highly appealing additional complexity from bottle ageing. The land-aged wine has a rounder, fuller structure with more honeyed notes.

Exactly what makes the sea-aged wine fresher is unclear, but factors such as high pressure and the different vibrations of the under-sea environment are thought to play a role. Both the land and sea-aged wines experienced low to non-existent levels of ultra violet light and constant low temperatures.
Source Southern Right/wine.co.za

This wine had cork closures - underwater there wouldn't be the oxygen effect on aging and the comparison description above sounds similar to comparing a screwcap closed wine with a traditional closure.
User avatar
Peter May
Pinotage Advocate
 
Posts: 2146
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 12:24 pm
Location: Snorbens, England

Re: Aging Wine Underwater

Postby Peter May » Sat Feb 23, 2013 1:10 pm

Peter May wrote:Since its only underwater for 3 months it is hardly an experiment in ageing....

I know several wineries have done this, one which I follow is Souther Right in South Africa who put their Sauvignon Blanc 9 metres under False Bay for 2 years.

I saw pix of the bottles afterwards, they were covered in barnacles, and the wine quickly sold out ..

The Southern Right team has already conducted several tastings comparing the sea-aged and cellar-aged bottles. In all tastings the sea-aged wine was fresher, tighter, lighter in colour and less developed, while still showcasing a highly appealing additional complexity from bottle ageing. The land-aged wine has a rounder, fuller structure with more honeyed notes.

Exactly what makes the sea-aged wine fresher is unclear, but factors such as high pressure and the different vibrations of the under-sea environment are thought to play a role. Both the land and sea-aged wines experienced low to non-existent levels of ultra violet light and constant low temperatures.
Source Southern Right/wine.co.za

This wine had cork closures - underwater there wouldn't be the oxygen effect on aging and the comparison description above sounds similar to comparing a screwcap closed wine with a traditional closure.


Three months sounds to me more of a publicity stunt than a serious experiment and I reckon they could get the same effect by using screwcaps. It'd be a lot cheaper - but has less publicity appeal.
User avatar
Peter May
Pinotage Advocate
 
Posts: 2146
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 12:24 pm
Location: Snorbens, England


Return to The Wine Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 6 guests