WTN: Many Burgs and other wines for Jim Jones (but w/o Jim)

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WTN: Many Burgs and other wines for Jim Jones (but w/o Jim)

Postby Dale Williams » Sat Jun 24, 2006 10:17 pm

Jim Jones (who had set up a great offline for my Japan visit last year) was scheduled to visit from Tokyo, and we invited some geeky friends to join us for dinner. Jim's meeting was cancelled, and he decided not to spend thousands of dollars to come just for dinner. We missed him, but the rest of us had a fun evening. A little loud at first, as Lucy the Basset had much to say to Lena the Basset, but eventually we were able to have some nice conversation.
We started on the patio with some smoked fish canapes and a pickle collection (Betsy and Jen had bonded about picklemania at an earlier offline). A couple of pleasant starters:

NV Pinon Vouvray Petillant
This isn't the "new batch", but my last bottle of previous release. Appley with just a hint of yeast. Jay says new batch is better, but this is pretty tasty for my tastes. B

2004 Leitz Rudesheimer Klosterlay Kabinett
Nose of white flowers and damp rocks, good peach and apple fruit on the palate. Rather mineral finish. Nice. B+

We never made it an Oupia rose, before it was time to go inside for the first course. Marrow bones for the dogs, a lobster/corn/tomato salad for the people (reminder to self- wait for local tomatoes rather than tasteless heirlooms from Whole Foods).

2000 Knoll Ried Kreutles Loibner Smaragd
This was a little funky at first. I thought it showed some signs of heat damage, though I bought from a reputable source not long after release. But that slight madeirized note dissipates by time I revisit much later. Apple fruit with some green lentil and pepper. Good, but I think I liked this better on release. B

2001 Bouchard "Perrieres" Meursault 1er
This, on the other hand, was rather mute at first. As it opened it seemed fairly oaky, but a real mineral base underneath. This is definitely not "fruit driven", but a nice stony Burg that needs time. B+

We moved on to the reds with some grilled lamb chops (ended up ok I think, though a miscommunication re grill temps almost caused disaster), a rice blend that won't be repeated, and a chopped salad. Mucho reds:

1988 Bouchard Le Corton
Slow oxygenated for a couple hours. Still had some funk at pouring time. A couple of folks really liked. I found pleasant but unremarkable. Some earth and meat over round red fruit. B

1997 St. Innocent "Seven Springs" Pinot Noir
Muted nose at first. After a short stint in decanters it opened prettily. Bright red fruit, floral and spice aromas. Why aren't more US Pinot Noirs like this? B+/A-

1986 Ch. Poujeaux (Moulis)
This spent hours in a decanter, but still showed quite young. Earthy with clear if not vigorous cassis fruit and some remaining tannins. B+

1979 Drouhin Chambertin Clos de Beze
Jay knew how much I liked this, and very generously brought along. Sweet pretty fruit, with waves of forest floor and mushroom aromas and a little hint of sandalwood. Balanced, long, and complex. Not a wine of power, but of elegance. I think I liked a bottle at Cafe Meze a couple months ago just a tad better, but this is my WOTN, despite some good competition. A-/A

1990 Ch. Bourgneuf (Pomerol)
Double-decanted a couple of hours before dinner, I wasn't too thrilled with a sip of the dregs. Seemed to be a victim of the downside of 1990- just roasted plums dominating everything. But at dinner a more complete wine had emerged- the red plum fruit still dominant, but the roasted note faded a bit and some leather and cedar adding to the mix. A-

1996 Jean Grivot Clos de Vougeot
Very primary, all about the cherry fruit. Needs time to sort itself out. B/B+

2000 Roumier Chambolle-Musigny
Ready and willing. Ripe red fruit, well-balanced, open and giving. Medium-bodied, clean finish. A-/B+

1997 Stonefly Cabernet Franc (Napa)
Ripe redcurrant jelly and a little damp earth. A bit low-acid for my tastes. Arv says he liked it better young. B

Somewhere in the mix the "red wine cheeses" (Hoch Ybrig, Keen's cheddar, Tomme de Savoie) had made their debut. With the blue (Valdeon) and a mango-somethingorother cake, the final wine of the night:
1976 Schloss Eltz Eltviller Sonnenberg Riesling Auslese (Rheingau)
Quite a deal for the $20 or so I paid. Just a hint of petrol, sweet apricot and quince fruit, a bit floral. Nice integrated flavors. A pleasant surprise.B+

Quite a fun evening of friends (and dogs). Betsy was a little unsatisfied with the food, but to me the company was the main thing- even better than the wines. Which showed pretty decently-not one I'd really call a dog....er, a slacker. We missed you Jim!

Afternote: with a tea-rubbed salmon dish (Ming Tsai) tonight, I revisited some of the Pinots. The 7 Springs was my fave tonight, followed by the Roumier. One sip and the '88 Bouchard and the Grivot went to vinegar jar.

Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency
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Re: WTN: Many Burgs and other wines for Jim Jones (but w/o Jim)

Postby Alan Uchrinscko » Sun Jun 25, 2006 10:25 am

You mean that a 1997 Seven Springs needed time to open and the after breathing revealed itself beautifully? I thought the media said that 1997 Oregon Pinots were bad and that we shouldn't buy them because they had no fruit when they were 2 years old...
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Re: WTN: Many Burgs and other wines for Jim Jones (but w/o Jim)

Postby Dale Williams » Sun Jun 25, 2006 12:54 pm

Thanks Alan for letting me know.
OK, how about this:
St. Innocent 7 Springs Pinot Noir: fruitless and dead.

So, Alan, I'm not a big Bouchard white fan. But the Meursault was really good on day 2. Has quality level on whites moved up?
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Re: WTN: Many Burgs and other wines for Jim Jones (but w/o Jim)

Postby Alan Uchrinscko » Sun Jun 25, 2006 8:45 pm

BTW - I wasn't being a smart *ss to you - that was a hit at at critics. They always hate Oregon vintages that don't taste like syrup upon releases. Which is why I had mor money to buy a LOT of '96 Oregon Pinots because about now they are rock-n-roll. 95 & 97 the critics hated moreso and while they are more troubling vintages for sure, a lot of the wines are beautiful now (and weren't that expensive to start)... + Mark Vlossak's wines take a while to unravel so to think that the '97 7 springs is yummy potential but not quite there yet makes sense to me...

As for Bouchard...I like their wines. The domaine bottlings (like the Perrierres) I think have the potential to be great, but they've been at least consistent for a while. American's think negociant = bad which is fine by me because Drouhin (particularly whites) Jadot (particularly reds), and Bouchard do fine enough for me and with less demand the prices seem all said and done reasonable to me...

'64 Bouchard Volnay 1er Caillerets is one of the best red burgs I've ever had, btw...
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Re: WTN: Many Burgs and other wines for Jim Jones (but w/o Jim)

Postby Dale Williams » Mon Jun 26, 2006 9:21 am

Alan, I should have put a smiley on my response- I knew exactly where you were coming from.

I agree with you re the "negociants=bad" syndrome. I think we had a thread here that addressed that. While I do avoid the Laboure-Roi/Mommessin type stuff, I often find the Drouhins and Jadots well-priced and good quality. I am a little surprised at your comment that you prefer the whites from Drouhin, as I feel the opposite. But my sampling of the whites is smaller.
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Re: WTN: Many Burgs and other wines for Jim Jones (but w/o Jim)

Postby Mark Lipton » Mon Jun 26, 2006 11:40 am

Dale Williams wrote:I agree with you re the "negociants=bad" syndrome. I think we had a thread here that addressed that. While I do avoid the Laboure-Roi/Mommessin type stuff, I often find the Drouhins and Jadots well-priced and good quality.


yup, yup, and more available in markets like my own, which are a bit more removed from the major ports of entry. If I restricted my purchases to all the D'Angervilles, Roumiers, Lafarges, Marechals and Fourriers that I find on store shelves, my Burgundy collection would be far smaller than it is (blessings be upon Chevillon and Kermit L. for the ubiquitous nature of his wines, too)

Mark Lipton

p.s. Nice notes (as usual) Dale! I agree 100% about the Roumier, but you knew that already. Too bad that Jim missed out on such treats.
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Re: WTN: Many Burgs and other wines for Jim Jones (but w/o Jim)

Postby Diane (Long Island) » Mon Jun 26, 2006 10:02 pm

I have both Bouchard and Sauzet Perrieres Meursault 2001and I so want to open one. I keep postponing it based on the recs of others and now your note. Much better on day 2 - so what do you think, another 1-2 years?
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Re: WTN: Many Burgs and other wines for Jim Jones (but w/o Jim)

Postby Alan Uchrinscko » Wed Jun 28, 2006 2:01 am

Sauzet despite the fact that they are considered a top domaine actually drink pretty well young. [I'm assuming the Sauzet is Puligny Perrierres.] Puligny Perrierres is a much more "open" vineyard than Meursault Perrierres, so if I were going to do either, it'd be the Sauzet...

Oh and Dale, I see your point on the Drouhin. I have had a handful of good white experiences recently so I guess that's why I put that. I agree the reds can be excellent as well, particularly the lights-out 89's for instance. But I type fast and think little so always assume that I'm not paying all that much attention when I'm responding...
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