Open Mike: 94 Bordeauxs

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Re: Open Mike: 94 Bordeauxs

Postby Jenise » Wed Jul 23, 2008 7:13 pm

Felix Warners wrote:What do you mean with "traditional". The shop where I work we sell the 2001 Canon but I havent tried it (yet) and never had a Canon before.


I don't think Dale saw your question, so I'll answer for him: Canon = traditional, Monbousquet = modern.
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Re: Open Mike: 94 Bordeauxs

Postby Dale Williams » Thu Jul 24, 2008 9:21 am

Jenise wrote:
Felix Warners wrote:What do you mean with "traditional". The shop where I work we sell the 2001 Canon but I havent tried it (yet) and never had a Canon before.


I don't think Dale saw your question, so I'll answer for him: Canon = traditional, Monbousquet = modern.


Thanks Jenise, I did miss the question.
Felix, Jenise gave great examples. It's of course impossible to divide wines neatly into categories, but I'd put Canon (along with Figeac, Magdelaine, L'Arrossee, Soutard) firmly to traditional side of spectrum. Pavie, Pavie-Decesse, Monbousquet would be well-known super-moderns. Others are in the middle (maybe La Gaffeliere and Larmande just to traditional side of middle, Troplong Mondot, Angelus, & Pavie-Maquin on modern side but not as full tilt as previous examples). I can appreciate each style (though the full throttle modern is best in small quantities for me!).
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Re: Open Mike: 94 Bordeauxs

Postby Matt Richman » Thu Jul 24, 2008 1:24 pm

I personally count Troplong on the "modern" side with Pavie etc.
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Re: Open Mike: 94 Bordeauxs

Postby Felix Warners » Fri Jul 25, 2008 5:52 am

Thanks for the response.
I find this whole modern and traditionalist thing a bit difficult, I guess I just have to buy a bottle of Canon and check it out. I kind of like the "modern" style I guess since I like the wines I have tasted from Monbousquet, Pavie-Maquin, Dominique, Clos de l'Oratoire to name a few.
If wines that are made from ripe grapes with new oak and low yields is modern I guess I'm a modern wine lover when it comes to Bordeaux. Somehow even the "modern" Bordeaux wines never really become heavy for me.
I have very limited experience with Bordeaux and most of the wines mentioned like Pavie, Angelus and Troplong Mondot I have never tasted so maybe there are a lot of fullbodied wines out there but then I have not tasted one yet. Still a lot of work to do :lol:
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Re: Open Mike: 94 Bordeauxs

Postby wrcstl » Fri Jul 25, 2008 9:01 am

Felix Warners wrote:Thanks for the response.
I find this whole modern and traditionalist thing a bit difficult, I guess I just have to buy a bottle of Canon and check it out. I kind of like the "modern" style I guess since I like the wines I have tasted from Monbousquet, Pavie-Maquin, Dominique, Clos de l'Oratoire to name a few.
If wines that are made from ripe grapes with new oak and low yields is modern I guess I'm a modern wine lover when it comes to Bordeaux. Somehow even the "modern" Bordeaux wines never really become heavy for me.
I have very limited experience with Bordeaux and most of the wines mentioned like Pavie, Angelus and Troplong Mondot I have never tasted so maybe there are a lot of fullbodied wines out there but then I have not tasted one yet. Still a lot of work to do :lol:


Felix,
I tend to like the more traditional style Bordeaux and have been drinking Bordeaux for many years. I was fortunate enough to begin to cellar them when they were still reasonably priced. Today I buy very few classified growths due to the price. Regardless of my opinion, it is obvious that you have sampled and thought about the style Bordeaux you like. Bordeaux will never be a "huge" wine, compared to an Aussie Shiraz, many west coast cabs or Barolos but in the modern vs the traditional discussion you seem to be in one 50% sector and I in the other 50% sector, so there is no really correct position. The thing I like about Bordeaux besides it's flavor profile is the most will cellar longer than many other regions of the world.
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Re: Open Mike: 94 Bordeauxs

Postby Chris Kissack » Sun Jul 27, 2008 9:22 am

Bill Spohn wrote:It would surprise me to hear anyone knowledgeable in Bordeaux condemn this vintage wholesale as 'crap'. If you are selective there are many decent wines. This was also the case in 1993, mostly on the right bank. If you want to pass simplistic judgements about a whole vintage, you'd be much safer with 1991 and 1992.

Good comments.

1994 doesn't fit in with the view that many seem to hold of Bordeaux today that it has to be fleshy, ripe, covered in baby fat for it to be 'good'. Whatever happened to the leaner, more sinewy style of Bordeaux? You can find some like that in 1994.

I have enjoyed Cos, all three Leovilles, Pontet Canet, Cheval-Blanc, Rauzan-Segla, Pichon-Lalande, Palmer, Haut-Bailly , La Louviere and more. I also enjoy continuing to work my way through a bunch of white de Fieuzals that I picked up at a good price many years ago. Good wines and thanks to the prevailing opinion of the vintage, good prices too.
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