Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Founded by the late Daniel Rogov, focusing primarily on wines that are either kosher or Israeli.

Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Daniel Rogov » Fri Oct 03, 2008 12:20 pm

Thanks to the efforts of forum member Richard Shafer (who is also most definitely "in the trade" with his Israel Wines Direct), Wilfred Wong tasted and scored a host of Israeli wines. Wong, who is the cellarmaster and senior buyer for Beverages and More (BevMo), a chain of 62 wine and beverage stores in California, has been around the wine scene for some 35 years and is broadly considered one of the influential figures on that scene.

Thanks to the courtesy of Richard, following is a list of the wines that were tasted and the Wong scores. Anticipating the question – alongside those are my own most recent scores for the wines in question. The full article about the tasting can be found at Richard's blog at http://israeliwineblog.com/

Palter, Sauvignon Blanc, 2007 Wong 90 Rogov 89
Flam, Sauvignon Blanc-Chardonnay, 2007 Wong 88 Rogov 89
Somek, Charonnay 2005 Wong Corked Rogov 88
Tzora, Cabernet Sauvignon, Giv'at HaChalukim, 2006 Wong 87 Rogov 88
Meishar, Cabernet Sauvignon, 730, 2005 Wong 87 Rogov 87
Flam, Classico 2006 Wong 82* Rogov 90
Pelter, Cabernet-Merlot-Cabernet Franc 2006 Wong 91 Rogov 91
Bravdo, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2005 Wong 87 Rogov 89
Somek, Cabernet Sauvignon-Merlot-Petit Sirah 2004 Wong 90 Rogov 88
Margalit, Cabernet Franc, 2005 Wong 92 Rogov 92
Margalit, Enigma, 2005 2005 Wong 93 Rogov 93

*As stated in the article, scheduled for re-tasting.


Best
Rogov
User avatar
Daniel Rogov
Resident Curmudgeon
 
Posts: 12964
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:10 am
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby RShaffer » Fri Oct 03, 2008 1:31 pm

Thanks, Rogov!

Wilfred tastes more than 10,000 wines each year so it was amazing to sit with him and hear his excitement and surprise with what's happening in the Israeli wine scene.

He was not familiar with any of these wineries which made things even more exciting. I liked bringing him some of The Future of Wine History to try, we had a good talk about how the eastern Med is the birthplace of wine etc.

He also spoke very fondly of his experience with wines from Yarden in the past.

We will see where this takes us and Israeli wines...one step at a time...and then another!

I am so fascinated by the alignment between your scores and Wilfred's. He (like you) is able to very rapidly evaluate and benchmark (score) wines he tastes. Amazing to watch someone like him in action.

New Year wishes to everyone on the Forum. If any members are ever in Chicago, PLEASE message me so we can meet up.

Richard
Richard Shaffer
Israeli Wine Direct
RShaffer
Wine geek
 
Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 10:41 pm
Location: Chicago

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Jan Schultink » Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:08 pm

Nice scores. The '06 Classico lottery pops up again...
User avatar
Jan Schultink
Ultra geek
 
Posts: 204
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2008 5:47 am
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Jenise » Fri Oct 03, 2008 5:14 pm

Rogov, those scores are too close. I think the truth must be: you ARE Wilfred Wong.

Btw, is Yarden palatable? I saw a bottle of Yarden cab the other day at around $15--so low I told myself that the Yarden was the Golan Winery product I was supposed to pass on in favor of something higher so that I too could have a proper Israeli wine experience.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
Jenise
FLDG Dishwasher
 
Posts: 25809
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 3:45 pm
Location: The Pacific Northest Westest

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Daniel Rogov » Fri Oct 03, 2008 5:25 pm

Jenise, Hi.....


Yarden is indeed the top series produced by the Golan Heights Winery and (depending on storage facilities of course) is their Cabernet Sauvignon wines are invariably both worthy of cellaring and worth drinking. In Gary Vaynerchuck's vernacular, fifteen smakers is a helluva buy and would make me wonder a bit. Thus, in addition to considering vintage years, consider the reliability of the dealer and his/her storage facilities. Also be sure to read the label carefully, for under the Yarden label is also released a wine known as Mt. Hermon Red and that, while an acceptable entry level wine, lacks excitement or true charm.

Perhaps as a guide, following are my most recent tasting notes for the Yarden Cabernet Sauvignon releases from 2000-2005.

Best
Rogov

Yarden, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2006: Full-bodied, with soft tannins and spicy oak integrating nicely. On the nose and palate ripe black and red berries and currants on a background of spicy oak, all touched with hints of spices, vanilla and light mineral-earthy overtones. Best 2010–2015. Tentative Score 89–91. K

Yarden, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2005: Brooding dark ruby-red, full-bodied, with near-sweet tannins and spicy oak wrapped around black currants, berries, spices and a hint of dark chocolate. Look as well for enchanting hints of citrus peel and vanilla on the long finish. Fine balance and structure bode well for the future. Best 2010–2018. Score 92. K

Yarden, Cabernet Sauvignon, Elrom Vineyard, 2004: Full-bodied, with still-firm tannins and spicy wood well on the way to integrating and already showing elegance and finesse. Look for layer after layer of currant, blackberry and wild berry fruits, those supported beautifully by notes of cedar, sage and tar, all leading to a near-sweet fruity finish that lingers on and on. Approachable now but best 2010–2016. Score 94. K

Yarden, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2004: Dark, almost impenetrable garnet, with generous wood in fine balance with acidity and fruits. Opens to show currants and crushed berries, those yielding to cranberries, ripe purple plums and dark chocolate, all on a background of spices, asphalt and earthiness. Drink now–2016. Score 92. K

Yarden, Cabernet Sauvignon, Elrom Vineyard, 2003: Intensely dark ruby toward royal-purple, full-bodied, with caressing tannins and a moderate oak influence. Opens with black currants, blackberries and minerals, goes to meaty, earthy and herbal aromas and flavors, and then to spices and a long and elegant fruity finish. Firmly structured with excellent grip and complexity. Best 2010–2020. Score 95. K

Yarden, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2003: Aged in French oak for 18 months and showing generous but gentle wood influence. Soft mouth-coating tannins support generous blackberry, black cherry and plum fruits and, on the long finish, hints of Oriental spices and a light herbal-tobacco sensation. Best 2009–2014. Score 93. K

Yarden, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2002: Dark garnet toward royal-purple, full-bodied, with firm tannins and spicy oak yielding nicely to reveal flavors and aromas of red currants, cherries and berries on first attack, those giving way to layers of sweet cedar, vanilla, leather and, on the long finish, a hint of anise. Rich, generous and elegant. Drink now–2012. Score 92. K

Yarden, Cabernet Sauvignon, Elrom Vineyard, 2001: Dark, almost impenetrable garnet-purple, full-bodied, with finely-tuned balance between generous well-integrated tannins and judicious oak, this exquisite wine shows complex tiers of aromas and flavors of red currants, berries and spices on the first attack, those opening to include light earthy and herbal overlays. Plush and opulent, with a long, complex finish. Among the best ever made in Israel. Drink now–2013. Score 95. K

Yarden, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2001: Full-bodied with finely tuned balance between wood, tannins and fruits. Showing plum, wild berry and spicy currant fruits, and reflecting its 18 months in oak with appealing overlays of vanilla, cedar, tobacco and cocoa. Drink now–2013. Score 91. K

Yarden, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2000: Full-bodied, still youthful, with firm tannins and generous oak well balanced by currants, blackberries and spicy cedarwood, those opening to plums and black cherries, all matched nicely with vanilla and an appealing herbal overlay followed by a long finish. Drink now–2011. Score 92. K
User avatar
Daniel Rogov
Resident Curmudgeon
 
Posts: 12964
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:10 am
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Eli R » Fri Oct 03, 2008 6:03 pm

Jenise wrote:Rogov, those scores are too close. I think the truth must be: you ARE Wilfred Wong.

Btw, is Yarden palatable? I saw a bottle of Yarden cab the other day at around $15--so low I told myself that the Yarden was the Golan Winery product I was supposed to pass on in favor of something higher so that I too could have a proper Israeli wine experience.


Jenice, Hi,

There are two possible explanations for a "yarden" at 15$:

1. It is an older vintage with high probability of being undrinkable. I have read in this forum that with Israeli wines in the US, the stores wants to get rid of old stock and instead of rasing the price for older vintages, reduce the price to clearance price tags - maybe expecting no return of bad bottles.

2. It was not the Yarden label CS, but the cheater Gamla or even the basic Golan label of the Golan Heights Winery.

Eli
Eli R
Wine guru
 
Posts: 755
Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 6:22 pm
Location: Rehovot, Israel

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Jenise » Fri Oct 03, 2008 6:38 pm

Eli, thanks for your advice. But it really was the Yarden, I saw it myself, and so cheap I thought I must have misunderstood Rogov's earlier advice on the wine (thinking the upper end would have been more). As for suppliers, I understand your caution, but where I live I have few choices. A distributor handles Wine X, and stores like the one I saw this in buy his stock. Thoiugh I can buy most wines from a number of retailers, they really all come from the same place.

Rogov, thanks for your notes. I have a call into the retailer right now to find out what vintage he has. I don't recall specfically, but it was a recent enough vintage--with anything but Musar or Lopez de Heredia, I'm very leery of uncurrent bottlings.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
Jenise
FLDG Dishwasher
 
Posts: 25809
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 3:45 pm
Location: The Pacific Northest Westest

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Gary J » Fri Oct 03, 2008 6:41 pm

Jenise wrote:Rogov, those scores are too close. I think the truth must be: you ARE Wilfred Wong.

Btw, is Yarden palatable? I saw a bottle of Yarden cab the other day at around $15--so low I told myself that the Yarden was the Golan Winery product I was supposed to pass on in favor of something higher so that I too could have a proper Israeli wine experience.


I think you must have seen the Yarden entry level wine "Mt Hermon" (red) which is a blend of Cab, merlot & Cab Franc. S simple wine intended to be drunkin its youth.

A Yarden Cab at $15 sounds wrong. It is generally priced from $25-35.

Hope that helps...
Wine Tasting Guy
http://winetastingguy.com/
User avatar
Gary J
Ultra geek
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2008 10:38 am
Location: NYC

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Jenise » Fri Oct 03, 2008 6:56 pm

Gary J wrote:
Jenise wrote:Rogov, those scores are too close. I think the truth must be: you ARE Wilfred Wong.

Btw, is Yarden palatable? I saw a bottle of Yarden cab the other day at around $15--so low I told myself that the Yarden was the Golan Winery product I was supposed to pass on in favor of something higher so that I too could have a proper Israeli wine experience.


I think you must have seen the Yarden entry level wine "Mt Hermon" (red) which is a blend of Cab, merlot & Cab Franc. S simple wine intended to be drunkin its youth.

A Yarden Cab at $15 sounds wrong. It is generally priced from $25-35.

Hope that helps...


Could be, I wasn't shopping for wine that day and wasn't paying the usual attention. But I'll find out soon!
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
Jenise
FLDG Dishwasher
 
Posts: 25809
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 3:45 pm
Location: The Pacific Northest Westest

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Jenise » Fri Oct 03, 2008 7:21 pm

Aw crap, yes it is the Mt. Hermon. I passed.

But I ordered an 05 Yarden CS.

What about Mt. Tabor and Galil? Also from the same distributor, there is a Mt. Tabor 06 Sauv Blanc for $14, and from Galil, all at $20, are an 06 Chardonnay, 06 Cabernet and 05 Merlot. Are any of these worthwhile?
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
Jenise
FLDG Dishwasher
 
Posts: 25809
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 3:45 pm
Location: The Pacific Northest Westest

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Daniel Rogov » Fri Oct 03, 2008 7:42 pm

Jenise, Hi…..

Tabor and Galil Mountain are two excellent medium-sized producers - the first producing close to 1,000,000 bottles annually and the second about 900,000 bottles. Both are striving successfully to bring good to excellent wines to the market at quite reasonable prices. Following are my tasting notes for the wines in question. All are still drinking very nicely but if you do go for the whites, I'd drink those within the next six months or so. The reds, as noted, will go for somewhat longer.

Best
Rogov

Tabor, Sauvignon Blanc, Adama, Gir, 2006: Bright shining straw in color, medium-bodied and aromatic, this unoaked white shows citrus, citrus peel, white peach and mineral aromas and flavors. Crisp and refreshing. Drink now. Score 87. K

Galil Mountain, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2006: Super-dark garnet, showing moderate spicy and vanilla notes and soft, near-sweet tannins . On the nose and palate blackberries and blueberries, currants and, coming in from mid-palate, hints of earthiness and freshly turned mushrooms. Drink now–2010. Score 90. K

Galil Mountain, Merlot, 2005: Deep, almost inky black-garnet, full-bodied, with firm but comfortably yielding tannins. Ripe berry, currant, green pepper and light herbal aromas and flavors, those coming together in a deep and complex terroir-driven wine. Drink now-2009. Score 89. K

Galil Mountain, Chardonnay, 2006: Light straw in color, medium-bodied, crisply fresh and aromatic, aged partly in oak and partly in stainless steel, showing apple, melon, citrus and tropical fruits with light creamy and spicy notes. Drink now. Score 88. K
User avatar
Daniel Rogov
Resident Curmudgeon
 
Posts: 12964
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:10 am
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Jenise » Fri Oct 03, 2008 9:25 pm

Thank you for that comprehensive response, Rogov. I'll try several of those.

Of course, I've now violated probation. :(
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
Jenise
FLDG Dishwasher
 
Posts: 25809
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 3:45 pm
Location: The Pacific Northest Westest

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Jeff_Dudley » Sat Oct 04, 2008 12:35 am

Daniel,

I don't doubt that the wines were good; your credibility seems impeccable from what I've seen on this board, by all accounts. I respect you and your palate by default.

But wow, what's with these scores ? Scary. Both you and Wong having your scores following the same narrow curve so closely makes it looks like a curve fitting exercise.

My point is, really is a question for you (or anyone here): does anyone ever see ratings published or leaked from Mr. Wong notes having scores within the 0 - 83 point range at all ? I just walked the entire BevMo here in Thousand Oaks and the shelf-talker placards do more than suggest that the implication behind my question is not a far reach. Yes, I understand set theory, and I also understand that wine-buying (if done well) would exclude placement of the most lowly-rated wines on the shelf. Well, at least you would exclude shelf talkers for the poorer ratings. :wink:

But there is a lot of junk tonight at BevMo having placards from Mr. Wong, with an enormous cluster of ratings from 86 - 88 points. These sit right next to some real quality wines rated the 89-90. Unless his scale is somewhat logarithmic or highly price-dependent (easy grader for low prices, etc.), Wong's opinion is just a hollow sales gimmick to me. Who would believe such stuff ?
"No one can possibly know what is about to happen: it is happening, each time, for the first time, for the only time."

James A. Baldwin
Jeff_Dudley
Ultra geek
 
Posts: 290
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 1:46 am
Location: SoCal

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Jenise » Sat Oct 04, 2008 1:43 am

Jeff, what little I've seen of Wilfred Wong's reviews bears out what you say. As well, he works for a chain and has an interest in promoting their wines. As such, on my very few visits to BevM, I've not taken any shelftalkers attributed to him seriously.
My wine shopping and I have never had a problem. Just a perpetual race between the bankruptcy court and Hell.--Rogov
Jenise
FLDG Dishwasher
 
Posts: 25809
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 3:45 pm
Location: The Pacific Northest Westest

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Daniel Rogov » Sat Oct 04, 2008 5:50 am

Jeff and Jenise, Hi.....

I'm fairly certain that Wilfred Wong and I have shared the press room facilities at Vinexpo (Bordeaux), ViniSud (Montpellier) and VinItaly (Verona) on several occasions but we've never met and, if the truth be told other than for his reputation as a very powerful buyer, I know little about him. True, now that we've touched bases via Israeli wines, I will seek him out at the next of those fairs.

With regard to the Israeli scores in particular, I cannot comment directly on his, but with regard to concordance you would find that in recent tastings both by Messrs Parker and Squires, the Wine Spectator and Decanter that their scores have been remarkably consistent with mine. That, frankly, was a source of many good internal feelings for me, because for quite a while many of my colleagues and those among the cognoscenti within Israel were saying that my scores were overly "Isra-centric" (i.e. too high). My answer to that was that others within Israel were giving scores that were simply too low. The publication of notes and scores by these people felt like a kind of mini-validation or, if one prefers, even a mini-redemption for me. That's nice for the ego in a small way but much nicer and much more important as a validation of my methodology and my palate.

As to shelf talkers, I never rely on those posted by buyers or the owners of wine stores because, as honest as they may attempt to be, they are after all, in business to sell wine. I make one major exception to that with regard to wine sales, in particular with auctions, and that is with the tasting notes of Serena Suthcliffe of Sotheby's. Two of the many reasons that I have for adoring Serena are her phenomenal palate and her impeccable sense of integrity. What I also respect in both shelf talkers and on internet sales sites are those who will post the reviews of critics x, y, and/or z especially when those reviews award scores of 80, 82, 83, etc. as that shows integrity on the part of the sales staff.

Also worth keeping in mind that even though many of "us" (quotes very intentional) will consider scores of 80-84 or even 85 as announcing wines not sophisticated enough for our palates, for the vast majority of folks, such scores indicate wines that are fine for them, especially at a certain price point, as either entry-level wines or wines for everyday drinking. In this case, truly a case of power to the people.

With regard to the relationship between scores and price, it is my firm belief that there should be no such correlation. Whenever possible wines should be tasted blind, evaluated and scored before any knowledge of either producer or price. No matter what revelations occur when seeing the labels and the price, there is no reason for changing a single word of the review and certainly not of the score. The only possible change that one might make is a shortening or extension of the projected drinking window, that based on the track-record/history of the winery in question. If there is to be a comment about price and value for money that should be a fully separate entry that complements but does not overide the tasting note and score.

Final note with regard to my scores - those who have seen my books on Israeli wines know that I do not hesitate to rate some local wineries as offering wines that I consider undrinkable (scores ranging from 50 - 65 are alas, not all that uncommon) and that even several of the best wineries are quite capable of producing mediocre wines at times. But then again, that is true of every wine producing area of the world.

Best
Rogov
User avatar
Daniel Rogov
Resident Curmudgeon
 
Posts: 12964
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:10 am
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Lior Yogev » Sat Oct 04, 2008 10:20 am

Jenise wrote:What about Mt. Tabor and Galil? Also from the same distributor, there is a Mt. Tabor 06 Sauv Blanc for $14, and from Galil, all at $20, are an 06 Chardonnay, 06 Cabernet and 05 Merlot. Are any of these worthwhile?

Hi Jenise,

Tabor's SB is one of the nicest Israeli SBs to my taste, and 14$ is quite reasonable. I would prefer the latest, 07 vintage, but since it's a screwcap I think the 06 is OK.
Galil Mountain make very nice wines. The merlot and cab are nice but quite simple table wines (those are the basic series and cost about 10$ locally). I wouldn't pay 20$ for them, and the 05 merlot might be slightly old (I think the 07 were released lately). The Chard is nice, the oak relatively integrated, but again, 20$ might be somewhat high for it. For a similar price you can get Pelter's unoaked chard which I believe is imported by the above Mr. Shaffer :)

My two cents...
Lior.
Lior Yogev
Wine guru
 
Posts: 513
Joined: Sat Jul 12, 2008 7:13 pm
Location: A green Israeli campus

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Jeff_Dudley » Sat Oct 04, 2008 1:40 pm

Daniel,

Thank you for replying and for remaining so focused, eloquent and objective. I appreciate that a great deal, especially when second reading of my own note caused me fits.

I think that I used the concurrence of the narrow range of scores seen from the Israeli tasting as an opening note to allow me to beat one of my usual drums. I detest how the narrow scoring range is used on shelf talkers to influence inexperienced retail buyers, but I didn't do a real good job on focusing on that.

For reasons you clearly would understand, I haven't used a shelf taker to influence a purchase of my own in about twenty years. I also stopped taking serious consideration of any professional wine reviewer just ten years ago, mostly because I felt that I'd found my own palate, understood what I liked, know how to find it, and actually preferred travel to wine producing regions - to reading about them.

I still enjoy this site. :)
"No one can possibly know what is about to happen: it is happening, each time, for the first time, for the only time."

James A. Baldwin
Jeff_Dudley
Ultra geek
 
Posts: 290
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 1:46 am
Location: SoCal

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Daniel Rogov » Sat Oct 04, 2008 1:58 pm

Jeff, Hi...

I'll defend consumers (and we should always keep in mind that critics are also consumers) in that visiting various wineries and wine regions and tasting wines on our own is the single most valid reason for adoring, liking, disliking or even out-and-out despising a given wine. I'll defend critics as well though, for sometimes the critic has a much broader exposure to many wines and, once you get to calibrate your own palate to his/hers, you may find that they give you clues in which oenlogical directions to move. All depends on the critic and the individual reader though - not agreement (unimportant), but direction.

Sheesh....where would I be if I could not, at least to some extent, defend the critical form? Suicide does not appeal...too many good wines yet to drink and too many fine meals yet to be consumed. Beyond those tastes, however, we shall not venture in public.

Best
Rogov
User avatar
Daniel Rogov
Resident Curmudgeon
 
Posts: 12964
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:10 am
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Jeff_Dudley » Sat Oct 04, 2008 3:04 pm

Yep, I like this thinking.
"No one can possibly know what is about to happen: it is happening, each time, for the first time, for the only time."

James A. Baldwin
Jeff_Dudley
Ultra geek
 
Posts: 290
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 1:46 am
Location: SoCal

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Avi Hein » Sat Oct 04, 2008 4:47 pm

Jenise wrote:Aw crap, yes it is the Mt. Hermon. I passed.

But I ordered an 05 Yarden CS.

What about Mt. Tabor and Galil? Also from the same distributor, there is a Mt. Tabor 06 Sauv Blanc for $14, and from Galil, all at $20, are an 06 Chardonnay, 06 Cabernet and 05 Merlot. Are any of these worthwhile?


Rogov gave scores for Tabor winery for the Mt. Tabor, but I would suggest checking the bottle -- is it a black bottle? Apparently, in America, there is a wine called Mt. Tabor which I believe corresponds to the Israeli Hatabor, which is a different winery and seems to get far lower wine. I think the Mt. Tabor is HaTabor, and not Tabor -- one of the big frustrations in my own (modest) efforts to promote Israeli wines abroad is that there are both certain special labels that are US only (Kinneret) and also different names in America in a few cases.

The 06 Galil are quite good, though should be drunk soon. I wonder if the 2005 Merlot is past its peak, although it may still be fine for drinking soon. Galil Mountain's 2007 releases were recently released in Israel. I just had the 2007 Galil Mt. Merlot last night.
It's Israeli Wine 2.0 - HaKerem: The Israeli Wine Blog - http://www.israeli-wine.org
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/avihein - @avihein & http://www.twitter.com/israelwines - @israelwines
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/israelwine
User avatar
Avi Hein
Ultra geek
 
Posts: 267
Joined: Sat Jul 12, 2008 5:23 pm
Location: Israel

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Daniel Rogov » Sat Oct 04, 2008 5:09 pm

Indeed, Avi's point is well taken. Tabor winery is a four-star winery (consistently producing high-quality wines) while HaTabor is a one star winery (hard to recommend). Considering that the second produces under 10,000 bottles annually, I doubt that these are the ones being offered but, to be on the safe side, here is a link to what the label on the Tabor wines should look like....
Attachments
Tabor1.JPG
(592.75 KiB) Downloaded 27 times
User avatar
Daniel Rogov
Resident Curmudgeon
 
Posts: 12964
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:10 am
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Avi Hein » Sun Oct 05, 2008 5:04 am

Daniel Rogov wrote:Indeed, Avi's point is well taken. Tabor winery is a four-star winery (consistently producing high-quality wines) while HaTabor is a one star winery (hard to recommend). Considering that the second produces under 10,000 bottles annually, I doubt that these are the ones being offered but, to be on the safe side, here is a link to what the label on the Tabor wines should look like....


Onlinekosherwine.com sells Mount Tabor, which is a different label than Tabor. See it at https://wwws.onlinekosherwine.com/product_info.php?products_id=1763. Looks similar to the label for Hatabor in Rogov's book (although it could be something else, but this is definitely not Tabor). Confusing, yes, but unfortunately something to look out for.
It's Israeli Wine 2.0 - HaKerem: The Israeli Wine Blog - http://www.israeli-wine.org
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/avihein - @avihein & http://www.twitter.com/israelwines - @israelwines
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/israelwine
User avatar
Avi Hein
Ultra geek
 
Posts: 267
Joined: Sat Jul 12, 2008 5:23 pm
Location: Israel

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Daniel Rogov » Sun Oct 05, 2008 5:41 am

To see the full line of the recommended Tabor wines (those accompanied by photos of labels) see the English language part of their internet site at http://www.taborwinery.com/tavor_seria_eng.html

Best
Rogov
User avatar
Daniel Rogov
Resident Curmudgeon
 
Posts: 12964
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:10 am
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel

Re: Wilfred Wong Tastes Israeli Wines

Postby Eli R » Sun Oct 05, 2008 4:12 pm

Daniel Rogov wrote:Jenise, Hi.....
Yarden, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2004: Dark, almost impenetrable garnet, with generous wood in fine balance with acidity and fruits. Opens to show currants and crushed berries, those yielding to cranberries, ripe purple plums and dark chocolate, all on a background of spices, asphalt and earthiness. Drink now–2016. Score 92. K
K


Daniel, Hi,

I was updating my cellar notes and just realized that the Yarden, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2004 has been recently "upgraded" by one point and 3 additional years.
Have you retasted agan and again lately?

Thanks,

Eli
Eli R
Wine guru
 
Posts: 755
Joined: Mon Jul 14, 2008 6:22 pm
Location: Rehovot, Israel

Next

Return to Israeli and Kosher Wine Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests